• Short Summary

    Archaeologists in Italy have dug up a major work of art from the second century A.

  • Description

    1.
    CU Statue of sun god Apollo on display in grounds of villa gallery near Rome.
    0.13

    2.
    CU photograph of original Apollo.
    0.21

    3.
    GV site where statue found.
    0.27

    4.
    SV INT. showing place where statue unearthed.
    0.37

    5.
    SV PAN DOWN archaeological sit and other finds waiting for cataloguing. (2 shots)
    0.50

    6.
    SV INT. In Rome archaeological finos waiting for restoration (2 shots)
    1.12

    7.
    SV technician repairing broken arms on statues.
    1.26

    8.
    SV antiquities experts placing sections of arm and foot alongside Apollo statue. (3 shots)
    1.54



    Initials YT/0132



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Archaeologists in Italy have dug up a major work of art from the second century A.D. It is a statue of the sun god Apollo. In antiquity it was the focal point for worship at a religious site now being excavated at Terme di Vicarello, 25 miles (40 kilometres) north of Rome.

    SYNOPSIS: The statue, which has lost its arms and legs, originally stood about six feet (2 metres) high. It is now undergoing restoration work.

    Experts describes it as a most beautiful copy of this Apollo statue, the Apollo Belvedere in the Vatican.

    The find was made in the ruins of a temple where the sun god's followers worshipped.

    The area is known for its hot thermal springs, and even until recent times, it as called the place of Apollo's waters. Now, archaeologists are busy retrieving the treasures left behind by gouty Romans who went to bathe in the curative waters. Many of the treasures - the Apollo among them, - are being taken to Rome for restoration work at the National Antiquities Gallery at Villa Giulia.

    Many of the statues have suffered quite severe damage. Here, technicians are repairing broken arms.

    It is hoped that the missing limbs of the Apollo statue can be found and pieced together, but it promises to be a long, painstaking job. The statue has also suffered damage from water erosion, but here the experts at the National Antiquities Gallery are more hopeful they can stop the corrosive process.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA2Z1G12TFKN6G15KYHL60I0NUE
    Media URN:
    VLVA2Z1G12TFKN6G15KYHL60I0NUE
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    12/08/1977
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    MP4
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:55:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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