• Short Summary

    About 70 senior politicians, opposition leaders, and religious and academic figures launched a campaign on Wednesday (27 November) for an early return to democratic constitution in South Korea.

  • Description

    About 70 senior politicians, opposition leaders, and religious and academic figures launched a campaign on Wednesday (27 November) for an early return to democratic constitution in South Korea.

    About 40 of them, including opposition New Democratic Party leader Kim Young-Sam and former New Democratic presidential candidate Kim Dae-Jung, pledged "all possible peaceful joint action to win freedom and democracy" at a meeting in Seoul.

    They read a declaration which called for the establishment of a national council for the restoration of democracy, the release of all arrested or imprisoned dissidents and an end to suppression, of free criticism.

    Critics of South Korean President Park Chung Hee's tough rule resumed on Wednesday their campaign against the present constitution after calling off their protest last week to welcome U.S. President Gerald Ford.

    Religious circles, mostly Christians, staged a serious of prayer sessions in Seoul, demanding the restoration of human rights, the release of imprisoned political dissidents, and constitutional revisions. Police, using tear gas, broke up the rallies after brief clashes.

    Elsewhere, rallies and demonstration stated by university students and newsmen have been reported.

    SYNOPSIS: Demonstrations resumed on Wednesday in South Korea after a brief lull last week for U.S. President Cerald Ford's visit.

    Police clashed with a group of religious demonstrators in Seoul staging a prayer session to demand the restoration of human rights and the release of imprisoned political dissidents. Elsewhere other demonstrations involving students and newsmen were also reported.

    The demonstration coincided with a new political campaign launched in Seoul on Wednesday.

    Former New Democratic Party presidential candidate Kim Dae-Jung was among a group of 70 opposition leaders, religious and academic figures who pledged support for a return to a democratic constitution in South Korea.

    The new campaign called for a national council to set up a democratic constitution, the restoration of human rights, and the release of imprisoned political dissidents. It also called for an end to suppression of free criticism.

    At the meeting place on Wednesday, heavily armed police threw a massive security ring around the building.

    Seoul had been quiet last week as demonstrations were called off to welcome President Ford.

    But as the opposition members left the meeting on Wednesday, South Korean plain-clothes policemen led the leaders away. Minor scuffles broke out.

    One opposition assembly member, Park Byung-Dae, was arrested and thrown into a police jeep.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVA273L8VKIMJAW2TZ3QLG6V98NG
    Media URN:
    VLVA273L8VKIMJAW2TZ3QLG6V98NG
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    29/11/1974
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:38:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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