• Short Summary

    The Pakistan Supreme Court has announced that it will give its decision on Tuesday (6 February) on the appeal by Zulfikar Ali Bhutto against his death sentence.

  • Description

    1.
    1972: SCU: Bhutto signing constitutional agreement, other leaders watching. (2 shots)
    0.10

    2.
    SV: Bhutto shakes hands with colleagues, LV Bhutto leaves meeting. (2 shots)
    0.18

    3.
    1971: GV: crowd at Rawalpindi airport
    0.21

    4.
    SV, GV AND REAR V: Bhutto leaves aircraft, waves to crowd. (3 shots)
    0.35

    5.
    CU: welcoming banner
    0.42

    6.
    1973: MV: Bhutto enters National Assembly.
    0.45

    7.
    LV: President Chaudhry bows to members and takes seat.
    0.53

    8.
    MV: Bhutto seated among members, LV President on dias, PAN TO Bhutto rises and bows.
    1.07

    9.
    1977: GVs AND MVs: rioters advance, throw stones and clash with police. (5 shots)
    1.25

    10.
    MVs AND GVs: rioters roll out paving stones, throw stones, police and police trucks, burning vehicles. (6 shots)
    1.38

    11.
    CU: newspaper headline 'Martial law proclaimed'
    1.44

    12.
    CU: newspaper photograph General Zia ul-Haq.
    1.47

    13.
    MV: General Zia on platform at meeting, GV audience
    1.54

    14.
    LV: Bhutto entering court building with lawyers.
    2.02

    15.
    1978: CU: petition, pages turned.
    2.13

    16.
    CU: newspaper photographs, Raza Kasuri (2 shots)
    2.18

    17.
    CU: newspaper photographs family group, Kasuri's father on left, and closer shot father. (2 shots)
    2.22

    18.
    CU: Urdu newspaper, CU photograph of car.
    2.30

    19.
    CU: newspaper photograph body of Kasuri's father.
    2.35

    20.
    CU: newspaper photograph police chief.
    2.40

    21.
    1977: CU: Bhutto leaving court in crowd, waving, entering car, GVs crowd, car leaves. (2 shots)
    3.00



    Initials RH/



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The Pakistan Supreme Court has announced that it will give its decision on Tuesday (6 February) on the appeal by Zulfikar Ali Bhutto against his death sentence. In the meantime, a large number of Bhutto's supporters - his party claims that it runs into thousands -- have been taken into custody or put under house arrest with the object of forestalling demonstrations on behalf of the former Prime Minister when the verdict is announced.

    SYNOPSIS: Zulfikar Ali Bhutto who is fifty-one, was in power in Pakistan for five and a half years, first as President and then, under a new constitution, as Prime Minister. An articulate Western-educated aristocrat, he proclaimed Socialist principles, and had a vast popular following.

    He took over the leadership when Pakistan's fortunes were at their lowest ebb, after the unsuccessful war with India in 1971, and the loss of its eastern province, which had become Bangladesh. He restored civilian government after thirteen years of military rule, but has since been accused of tyrannical methods in his determination to retain power.

    Bhutto was no stranger to high office. He had been Minister of Commerce, and then Foreign Minister, under the previous military governments. In August 1973, he was appointed to the premiership by a vote of the Senate and National Assembly. Early in 1977, he called a general election.

    This was his undoing, and led the widespread disorder. He won the election easily, but was accused of rigging the results. In two months of rioting, more than three hundred lives were lost.

    Bhutto conceded that new elections should be called, but could not agree with the opposition about the conditions.

    In July 1977, the army stepped in to restore order. General Zia ul-Haq took control. He now has the final word on Bhutto's fate, and has been quoted as saying that, if the court say Bhutto should hang, he will hang. After Bhutto's downfall, a whole series of charges were brought against him alleging kidnapping, conspiracy and corruption while in office. The main charge, on which he was found guilty and sentenced to death last March, was on a private petition accusing him of instigating a political murder.

    The petition was brought by Ahmed Raza Kasuri, a former colleague and later opponent of Bhutto's. The former Prime Minister, he asserted, had ordered his assassination. But, by mistake, gunmen who ambushed his car in Lahore in 1974, shot and fatally wounded his father instead.

    The most damaging witness was a security chief, Masood Mahmud, who testified that Bhutto had ordered the killing.

    During the appeal hearing, Bhutto denounced Mahmud's evidence as 'a tissue of lies' But he has said that, if his conviction is upheld, he wants no appeal for clemency to be made on his behalf.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAWTM6OCRF4F8ZVW2RVCLSDUIJ
    Media URN:
    VLVAWTM6OCRF4F8ZVW2RVCLSDUIJ
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    05/02/1979
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:01:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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