• Short Summary

    For the first time, there were enough servicemen in Pakistan's returning prisoners of war for army and air force chiefs to gather in welcome at the Wagah border near Lahore.

  • Description

    For the first time, there were enough servicemen in Pakistan's returning prisoners of war for army and air force chiefs to gather in welcome at the Wagah border near Lahore.

    Almost all the prisoners repatriated the week before were civilians. Several said they had suffered from poor conditions and brutality in India. One military doctor, Flight Lieutenant Masood, said civilian camps were much worse than military ones.

    India and Pakistan have agreed on the repatriation of some 300,000 people held since their 1971 war. It involves the sending home of Bengalis from Pakistan, non-Bengalis from Bangladesh, and Pakistan P.O.W's from India.

    The Pakistani prisoners returned in a crowded train carrying about eight hundred. One baby girl suffocated in the final hours of the 600-mile journey and many of the military personnel were carried over the border on stretchers.

    In an official message, Prime Minister Zulfikar Ali Bhutto told the prisoners they had returned to a new and vibrant Pakistan, determined to carve out a rightful destiny. He said the pain and anguish of the past had given way to hope and faith in the future.

    United Nation's officials said four planes making two round trips could carry 1,200 people a day each way between Lahore, Karachi and Dacca.

    Pakistan is anxious to put the plan into operation because India is insisting on strict coordination between this programme and the speed at which Pakistani prisoners of war are sent home from India.

    SYNOPSIS: Pakistani prisoners of war crossing the India/Pakistan border at Wagah, near Lahore, told of poor conditions and brutality in India. One military doctor said civilian camps were the worst.

    Last Wednesday was the first time there have been enough servicemen in the returning batch of about six hundred for Pakistani army and air force chiefs to gather in welcome. Almost all the prisoners repatriated the week before were civilians. India and Pakistan recently agreed to exchange three hundred thousand people held since their nineteen seventy-one war. It involves the sending home of Bengalis from Pakistan, non-Bengalis from Bangladesh, and Pakistan POWs from India.

    The Pakistan prisoners return in crowded train loads. One baby girl suffocated in the final hours of the six hundred mile journey.

    The United Nations officials say four planes making two round trips daily could carry one thousand two hundred people each way between Lahore, Karachi and Dacca. Pakistan is anxious to operate the plan, because India is insisting on strict co-ordination between this programme and the speed at which pakistani prisoners of war are sent home from India.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAN0WV7AZBJXVW02E2LZE4RC23
    Media URN:
    VLVAN0WV7AZBJXVW02E2LZE4RC23
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    05/10/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:25:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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