• Short Summary

    Model aircraft may be a childhood hobby, but when a model plane club consists entirely of professional pilots, one can expect models that really do fly.

  • Description

    1.
    GV & SVs Men in white overalls with model aircraft outside workshop (5 shots)
    0.25

    2.
    GVs Truck with models arriving at airstrip
    0.29

    3.
    Gv & SVs Men unloading model planes and assembling models (5 shots)
    0.49

    4.
    GV Wind-sock and spectators and newsmen looking on (2 shots)
    0.56

    5.
    GV Model of B-17 Flying Fortress taking off; man directing plane with remote controls (2 shots)
    1.07

    6.
    GV Model; Jet Ranger helicopters
    1.13

    7.
    GVs and SVs Zero fighter plane model taking off, crowd watching more model aircraft together (3 shots)
    1.27

    8.
    GV Large scale model of YS11 pushed out on runway
    1.33

    9.
    GV De Havilland 34 Comet model taking off and in flight (2 shots)
    1.46

    10.
    GV Spectators
    1.49

    11.
    YS11 Taking off, in flight, coming in for shaky landing (6 shots)
    2.42




    Initials AB/BB





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Model aircraft may be a childhood hobby, but when a model plane club consists entirely of professional pilots, one can expect models that really do fly. All members of the club in Tokyo fly for the Japanese domestic airline T.D.A. The enthusiasts are headed by veteran pilot Tochihiko Oikawa. The models were taken to an airstrip in Chiba Prefecture, outside Tokyo, on July 10 for the All-Japan Carnival of Radio-Controlled Planes. Spectators and press watched different models take to the air in the somewhat windy conditions. A model of the famous World War Two U.S. bomber, the B-17 Flying Fortress, took to the air as her 'pilot' used remote controls to direct her actions from the ground. Model Jet Ranger helicopters were also put through their paces. Another World War Two model on display was the famous 'Zero' fighter plane, the star of Japan's pre-war airforce and used to devastating effect in the Pearl Harbour raid on December 7, 1941. The model Zeros are so realistic that they have been used in films about the war. The highlight of the show came when the club's quarter-scale model of a YS11 was pushed out on the runway. At 6.5 metres long with a wing span of eight metres it is the largest radio-controlled plane in the world. Toshihiko Oikawa's favourite model, the red De Havilland 34 Comet, was also on show.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVALC2TTG78QKZL2K3W7FEIB9IX
    Media URN:
    VLVALC2TTG78QKZL2K3W7FEIB9IX
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    12/07/1984
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:45:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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