• Short Summary

    Zambia's President Kenneth Kaunda, who is seeking a fifth consecutive term of office, seems certain to be re-elected on October 27.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Drummers and dancers at rally in Lusaka. (2 SHOTS)
    0.16

    2.
    GV Crowd gathered for rally, and huge Kenneth Kaunda poster.
    0.21

    3.
    GV Crowd awaiting arrival of speaker.
    0.34

    4.
    SV Secretary General of ruling party Humphrey Mulemba speaking. (English SOT)
    1.00


    TRANSCRIPT: MULEMBA: (SEQ 4) "I want to thank all the party militants for having organised the party so well over the last few years. Against this background, I'd like to hank through you, the peasants, the workers, the intellectuals, the landed people in this nation, for what makes Zambia what it is today."





    Initials PJ/RAN/JRS





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Zambia's President Kenneth Kaunda, who is seeking a fifth consecutive term of office, seems certain to be re-elected on October 27. He is the sole presidential candidate and his United National Independence Party (UNIP) is the only political organisation in the country. Despite his position, party are keen to avoid a poor turnout by voters, or a marginal victory, while the country is in the throes of its worst economic recession since independence in 1964. In an effort to win over the 2.4 million registered voters. UNIP has launched a carefully orchestrated campaign, complete with radio and cinema advertisements, pop songs and educational programmes. On October 20, huge crowds gathered in the capital Lusaka to hear UNIP Secretary-General Humphrey Mulemba, thank everybody for making Zambia one of the most stable nations in Africa. The crowd that gathered for the rally carried paintings of the 59-year-old president, and chanted pro-Kaunda slogans while Mr. Mulemba spoke. The president needs 51 per cent of the vote to retain office, and electors are simply asked to vote yes or no, to the candidate. A vote for the president is registered as a cross against the national emblem of a flying eagle, while a vote against, is a frog. Party officials hope President Kaunda will gain somewhere near the 80 per cent "yes" vote he recorded five years ago. However, this will mean improvements in areas such as the Southern Province, where he faces strong opposition from the now defunct African National Congress.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAF1195KK2U8ARTFP51SEH2K4CW
    Media URN:
    VLVAF1195KK2U8ARTFP51SEH2K4CW
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    22/10/1983
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:00:58:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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