• Short Summary

    Government radio bulletins form Manila on Wednesday (27 September) stressed that life was continuing as normal in the Philippines after five days of martial law.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Street scenes in Manila (3 shots)
    0.11

    2.
    GV, SV TILT DOWN - Gun shop (3 shots)
    0.24

    3.
    GV PAN Vegetable market (2 shots)
    0.35

    4.
    SVs TILT DOWN - Fruit & egg stall with prices (3 shots)
    0.56

    5.
    SV Policeman near market
    1.02

    6.
    SV PAN ZOOM INTO CU Militiamen shows girl that skirt is too short
    1.12

    7.
    GV PAN Bulletin newspaper building & paper vans (4 shots)
    1.28

    8.
    MV Sign "Marcos - Hitler II"
    1.33

    9.
    GV, SV PAN Militia rub painting over slogans (4 shots)
    1.55



    Initials SGM/1758 SGM/1734



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Government radio bulletins form Manila on Wednesday (27 September) stressed that life was continuing as normal in the Philippines after five days of martial law.

    President Ferdinand Marcos imposed military control a week ago and spoke of the need to clean up corruption in public life and combat subversive elements intending to overthrow the Government.

    More than 100 people have been detained under martial law. They include a number of senators, congressmen, provincial governors, newspaper editors and the secretary-general of the opposition Liberal Party, Senator Benigno Aquino.

    Prince control, a ban on firearms, and sweeping new powers of arrest, have been announced on Government radio and television. They're being enforced in the streets of Manila by police, soldiers and uniformed militiamen.

    SYNOPSIS: Commercial life was reported back to normal in Manila on Wednesday -- the fifth day of martial law in the Philippines. There were few signs of military presence.

    Gun stores, however, were closed under a new regulation ordering firearms to be handed over to the Army. President Marcos imposed martial law a week ago in order, he said, to clean up corruption in public life and counter subversive elements intending to overthrow the Government with outside support. Police and the Army were given sweeping new powers of arrest.

    Price control has been introduced and militiamen check prices in Manila markets for violations against a new scale set by a Price Control council. Government radio has reassured housewives that necessary commodities are plentiful.

    Police and the Army have been given power to arrest anybody suspected of insurrection, usurping authority, graft, price-manipulation and other crimes....and, it seems, the power to order girls to lengthen their skirts.

    All private radio and television stations and all except one of M
    Manila's newspapers have been closed down by Government order. Journalists may interview only authorised officials and cameramen are prohibited form filming anything other than normal city life.

    Signs comparing President Marcos with Hitler have been painted in Manila streets. Correspondents report, however, that Philippines in general hope the president can make his reforms work. But to stifle dissent, more than one hundred people are under arrest, including opposition party leaders, senators, provincial governors and newspaper editors.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAEU54H4CDZI7QRJ44GUJLHWC6Q
    Media URN:
    VLVAEU54H4CDZI7QRJ44GUJLHWC6Q
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    28/09/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:55:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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