• Short Summary

    The two rival factions of Rhodesia's African National Council, led by veteran nationalist, Joshua Nkomo, and Bishop Abel Muzorewa, have been holding massive rallies in a bid to attract support for their claims to lead an eventual black government.

  • Description

    The two rival factions of Rhodesia's African National Council, led by veteran nationalist, Joshua Nkomo, and Bishop Abel Muzorewa, have been holding massive rallies in a bid to attract support for their claims to lead an eventual black government.

    SYNOPSIS: The largest of the nation-wide meetings were held in the black African township of Highfields, outside the Rhodesian capital Salisbury. Strictly speaking, under Rhodesian security laws the gatherings were illegal -- but the organisers claimed they were 'press conferences'. Mr. Nkomo's rally -- he himself is still in Geneva at the conference on Rhodesia's future -- attracted fewer supporters. But his power-base is in the southern half of the country, and among rural rather than urban blacks.

    In contrast, Bishop Muzorewa's rally -- or 'press conference', attended by a handful of white' newsmen -- attracted a crowd of some thirty thousand Africans. The Bishop was also away in Europe for the Geneva conference, but sent back a deputy to take his message to the people. The Bishop, a relative newcomer to Rhodesian politics, attracts the support of urban Africans, especially in the northern Mashona and Manica tribal areas like Salisbury.

    It was one of bishop Muzorewa's first lieutenants, ANC vice-President, Dr. Elliot Gabellah, who was sent home from Geneva to carry the message. This was one man, one vote, and an invitation to whites in Rhodesia to join the party before the country comes under a black government within the next two years. The Bishop, who commands sufficient popular support to make him a strong contender for leadership in any open vote, wants the interim government of the nation to be elected. This is a point of contention at the Geneva conference. Prime Minister Ian Smith wants it appointed, with key ministerial posts like law and defence to remain in white hands. Black leaders like Robert Mugabe, representing guerrilla forces, is also against interim elections.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAET6L45EYVTG7ETC84X6Q95XGN
    Media URN:
    VLVAET6L45EYVTG7ETC84X6Q95XGN
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    06/12/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:53:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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