• Short Summary

    A technical college established in Vientians, Laos, with funds from the West German government has helped to increase the number of skilled Laotian tradesmen since its opening in 1964.

  • Description

    A technical college established in Vientians, Laos, with funds from the West German government has helped to increase the number of skilled Laotian tradesmen since its opening in 1964.

    Run along the lines of a European trades school, the college has already trained 200 Laotian students in skills such as metal work, auto-mechanics, electronics and plumbing.

    A three-year training programme emphasises practical training rather than classroom lectures. Students attending the school live in dormitories and receive on-the-job training in large work halls under the supervision of West German technical experts.

    SYNOPSIS: The Laotian-German Technical College, located near the Mekong River, was established in 1964 with a two-million (USA) dollar grant from the West German government. The school is designed to increase the number of skilled and semiskilled workers entering the Laotian Labour market. Since its beginning eight years ago, the college has produced 200 qualified Laotians in trades such as auto-mechanics, electronics. metal work, tool-marking and plumbing. The school will eventually be transferred to the Laotian government.

    Laotian youngsters, ranging from 14 to 18 years of age, are initially admitted to the school for one year period. New classes begin with 100 trainees. Of these, 50 leave the programme at the end of the first year with certificates indicating their semi-skilled qualifications. The remaining half, selected for their superior work during the first year, then go on for a further two years of training. In the end, they receive a certificate of qualification similar to those awarded at European trade schools.

    Besides serving as an educational institution, the college is also a small factory. Trainees have used the skills taught to them by professional West German craftsmen to build a large steel-work hall. The on-the-job method of training has enabled students to make mechanical parts, furniture, and water treatment facilities which are then either sold or used to improve college facilities.

    The college earned about 14-thousand dollars (US) from the sale of mechanical parts and machine tools manufactured by trainees between 1968 and 1971. In addition furniture, plumbing works, and water treatment facilities made by the students have brought the school another 60 thousand dollars. The profit's have been used to better the school's training facilities.

    Of the 35 hours the students spend training wach week, only six are spent attending lectures. The rest of the time is spent in work-shops. Those enrolled in the college live there in dormitories, some of which were constructed by the trainees themselves.

    Paul Rupp, the German director of the college, says the school aims not only at achieving a high level of technical expertise among trainees, but also "at changing their ways of thinking and their mental attitudes."

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAER9L51R55JEAJJBCG4C2VQKI
    Media URN:
    VLVAER9L51R55JEAJJBCG4C2VQKI
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    08/03/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:39:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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