• Short Summary

    February the 13th saw the fourth anniversary of the unilateral creation of what is called the Turkish Federated State of Cyprus.

  • Description

    1.
    GV: Attaturk Square in Turkish Nicosia.
    0.06

    2.
    GV PAN FROM: Ledra palace TO Greek Sector of Nicosia ZOOM IN TO high rise flats.
    0.18

    3.
    GV: UN flag on buildings along demarcation line.
    0.22

    4.
    GV: Greek flags on buildings.
    0.26

    5.
    SV: soldiers walking in streets in Turkish Nicosia. (2 shots)
    0.37

    6.
    TGV ZOOM INTO: barrel barrier on beach at Varosha ZOOM OUT TO high-rise flats (2 shots)
    1.01

    7.
    GV PAN OVER: parliament building in Turkish sector.
    1.14

    8.
    SV INTERIOR PAN FROM: wall plaque of Attaturk TO members' seats.
    1.22

    9.
    SV: soldiers guarding entrance to village of Ormophita PAN TO sign saying 'Forbidden Area'.
    1.33

    10.
    GV: soldiers closing barrier PAN TO village entrance.
    1.44

    11.
    GV ZOOM OUT FROM: Greek church TO damaged buildings. (2 shots)
    2.00

    12.
    CU SIGN: saying Turkish area deserted under attack by Greek army.
    2.06

    13.
    GV: bus along street in Turkish quarter of Famagusta and family walking in street. (2 shots)
    2.21

    14.
    GV ZOOM OUT FROM: Greek church in village of Sipahi TO Greek houses.
    2.29

    15.
    SV: children outside house and Greek woman with children as others clean up yard and hang out washing. (3 shots)
    2.48

    16.
    SV PAN FROM: Greek church in Dipkarpaz TO Turkish coffee house next door.
    2.53

    17.
    SV: men seated on cafe verandah playing backgammon. (3 shots)
    3.06



    Initials RH/



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: February the 13th saw the fourth anniversary of the unilateral creation of what is called the Turkish Federated State of Cyprus. The state was set up after the Turkish invasion of the Greek-dominated island in 1974. Efforts to bring the two parts of the Cypriot community together have failed.

    SYNOPSIS: The former capital of the whole island - Nicosia - is now divided into Turkish and Greek sectors by what is called 'the Green line'. In 1974, a coup in Greece promoted by the then Greek military junta was used by Turkey as the reason for the invasion. Turkey said Greece intended to annex Cyprus. Now the island is split with the Greek community in the south and the Turkish community in the north.

    The once popular holiday resort of Varosha at the city of Famagusta is one of the stumbling blocks to negotiations. It was mainly a Greek Cypriot city captured by the Turks and kept in an abandoned state. Greek Cypriots want the city's inhabitants to be able to return while talks are held. The Turkish side had rejected this proposal, saying that if the talks were broken off, the Greek side would still have regained a significant piece of valuable territory. Meanwhile work is well under way on a site for a Turkish Parliament to meet under the eye of Kemal Attaturk, the great Turkish leader.

    Major efforts have been made by the United Nations to bring the two sides together. Last November the United States put forward a 12-point plan as a basis for settlement. Modifications of the plan were made by Mr Waldheim, the Secretary General of the UN, which maintains a peacekeeping force on the island. Both sides admit that serious differences still remain. The Turkish-Cypriot leadership's demands for a return to negotiations have been rejected by Greek Cyprus. The conditions were the lifting of the economic blockade on the north of the country and an agreement that the Greeks would stop what was termed the "internationalisation" of the Cyprus problem. One senior Greek-Cyprus problem. One senior Greek-Cypriot official said that to recognise the north's airport - and the port at Famagusta - would be to admit that a separate state existed, and consolidate the gains of the invasion.

    Some Greeks still live in the north. On Sipahi, half the town's six hundred residents are Greek and they go about their business undeterred by the occupation. Some two hundred thousand Greeks fled from the north, stripping it of much of its economic base, and it now depends heavily on Turkey - itself having troubles with its economy. Even some of the Turkish Cypriots admit that their standard of living has declined since the invasion.

    However, the Turkish Cypriots say they are willing to put up with the prevailing conditions as they now have greater security - not to mention the Greek businesses.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAEJE5XG8LGLSR9340DGEIK7UEY
    Media URN:
    VLVAEJE5XG8LGLSR9340DGEIK7UEY
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    13/02/1979
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:07:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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