• Short Summary

    Japan has been actively cultivating its relations with Middle East oil-producing countries since the Arabs launched an international oil offensive in 1973.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Supertanker in port
    0.03

    2.
    SCU Supertanker named Kashimasan Maru
    0.10

    3.
    GV Another supertanker waiting to be unloaded (2 shots)
    0.19

    4.
    LV Refinery (2 shots)
    0.27

    5.
    CU Blackboard of language school
    0.35

    6.
    SCU Students listening
    0.38

    7.
    CU Lecturer
    0.42

    8.
    GV Students listening
    0.46

    9.
    CU Girl pupils listening
    0.51

    10.
    CU Woman reciting (2 shots)
    1.01

    11.
    GV NEC building
    1.04

    12.
    CU Calculating machine with Arabic numerals (2 shots)
    1.10

    13.
    GV World map in office of NEC
    1.17

    14.
    GV PAN Factory floor
    1.23

    15.
    CU Destination ticket PULL BACK TO Machine
    1.26

    16.
    CU Destination card -- customer Egypt
    1.30

    17.
    MEDIUM PAN Factory floor
    1.38

    18.
    SV Technicians and engineers from Qatar at lecture PAN TO the visitors
    1.47

    19.
    SV Visitors listening
    1.54

    20.
    MV Instructor sitting at desk talking to students
    1.57

    21.
    MV Visitors working
    2.02


    VARIOUS VIEWS OF OIL TANKER IN PORT: VARIOUS VIEWS OF JAPANESE STUDENTS STUDYING ARABIC LANGUAGES AT LANGUAGE CENTRE: NIPPON ELECTRIC COMPANY: CALCULATORS WITH ARABIC NUMERALS: VARIOUS VIEWS OF COMPANY ACTIVITIES INCLUDING EXPORTS TO ARAB COUNTRIES: ARAB TECHNICIANS AND ENGINEERS AT LECTURE: VARIOUS VIEWS OF LECTURE IN PROGRESS.



    TANKER UNLOADING:



    Petrol-station:



    Yemen Embassy:



    Language School:



    N.E.C. Middle-East Department:



    N.E.C. Products for Mideast Export:



    Qatar Engineers:



    Egypt/Japan flags:




    Initials CL/1729 CL/1751



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Japan has been actively cultivating its relations with Middle East oil-producing countries since the Arabs launched an international oil offensive in 1973.

    Before November, 1973, Japanese businessmen, including politicians, knew little of the countries that provided Japan with 95.5 percent of oil to run their industries.

    Today, blossoming diplomatic relations have brought about thriving trade between Japan and the Middle East.

    The turning point in their relationship came with what was described as the Japanese counter-offensive at the end of 1973 when the now Prime Minister, Takeo Miki, visited the Middle East.

    It led to the establishment of new relations and embassies. Jordan set up an embassy in Tokyo in March, 1974, followed by the Yemen and the United Arab Emirates and several other Middle Eastern countries.

    Japanese exports include high-technology apparatus such as communications equipment and calculating machines -- which now come with Arabic numerals -- and totalled 3,680 million US dollars (about GBP1,600 million sterling) last year. And this year, in April alone, the amount was more than 505 million US dollars (nearly GBPL220 million sterling).

    The Japanese reciprocate by running courses for visiting Arab technicians and engineers. And to ease their working relationships, many Japanese businessmen and hotel employees are now taking courses in Arabic languages.

    SYNOPSIS: Japan must unload at least one oil supertanker at its ports each day to keep industry going. It imports up to ninety-six percent of its oil. Before the Arab oil-producers launched their oil offensive two years ago by drastically increasing prices, Japan worried little about the source of this oil. Most Japanese businessmen, including politicians and diplomats, knew little of the Arab countries.

    But since the oil offensive, the Japanese have been actively cultivating their relations with the Arabs. Today, businessmen and hotel employees are beginning to study Middle East languages to cope with their increasing contacts with Arab nations. This school -- the Porsian Language Centre -- was set up specifically to cater for this need. Diplomatic relations have also strengthened and many Arab nations have set up embassies in Tokyo.

    Alongside better relations, trade has expanded. Companies like the Nippon Electric are now manufacturing special calculators with Arabic numerals for their new clients. The Arab countries, particularly Egypt and Qatar, are importing more high-technology equipment such as communications apparatus. These exports brought Japan more than three thousand six hundred million dollars last year. And this year, in April alone, the amount was more than five hundred million dollars. In comparison, Japan's trade with other countries has remained static.

    Groups of Arab engineers and technicians -- such as this party from Water -- are now regularly seen around Japanese trading and manufacturing offices. They are attending induction courses to acquaint themselves with the working of the sophisticated technological gadgets they've bought with their new wealth.

    Japan, relying 95.5% on oil imports for its energy needs, must unload at least one supertanker at its ports every day to keep its industrial machine going. Before the middle-eastern oil-producing nations drastically raised crude oil prices in an 'oil offensive' on November 1973, Japan worried little about the source of its oil. The oil as far as they were concerned came from the American giant petroleum companies - the 'Majors' - and most Japanese businessmen and even politicians and diplomats knew little of the countries from where the oil was actually pumped.

    This ignorance of the Middle East changed dramatically with the "Oil Shokku" of 1973, when supplies became uncertain and prices tripled. Japan's oil bill rose four times from 3,000m to $ 16,000m. The price rises were passed on to the motorist and industry, spurring an already triggered inflation.

    Japan opened its own diplomatic counter-offensive, beginning with the Mideast visit of now Prime Minister Takeo miki at the end of 1973 and leading to the establishment of new relations and embassies and the strengthening of formerly tenuous ties. The Yemen Embassy was set up in Tokyo only in May 1974. Jordan set up an embassy two months earlier in March 1974, and the United Arab Emirates in December 1973. Other Middle Eastern missions have been expanded. to cope with the sudden flurry of diplomatic and trade business.

    Closer relations have also been hurriedly established on more oasis levels. many of the students at this new Persian language centre in central Tokyo are hotel employees anxious to learn the language of an increasing number of their guests, where before only English was necessary. The other students are businessmen taking this beginners course before being sent to Arab nations by their company to learn the languages and customs of their new trading partners at first hand.

    The newly-br??fed businessmen have no problem in finding jobs at Japan's trading companies new and rapidly-expanding Middle-East divisions, where they help their employers to find new export contracts to try and help offset Japan's growing trade-deficit with the oil-producers. The Japanese have come to the conclusion that alternative energy sources or other oil-producing nations such as the People's Republic of China are not the answer. All they can do is export in return for Middle-eastern oil. The blow is softened by the recycling of 'petrodollars' -- last year one deal alone brought in #1,000m from an 'unnamed' Arab country (Saudi Arabia).-- but Japan's economists and businessmen feel that exports are the primary answer to their problem.

    The exports -- usually high-technology apparatus such as this communications equipment for Egypt and Qatar -- have brought $3,680m back to Japan in 1974, as opposed to only $1,774m in 1973 before the "Oil Shokku". In April this year alone, over $505m worth of exports went to the Middle East in one month -- nearly a third of the exports for the entire year in 1973. By contrast Japan's trade with other countries has remained static and, because of recession, has at times even dropped. Japan, for example, sold $5,967m worth of exports to the E.E.C. last year --- virtually no change from the previous year.

    Groups of Mid-eastern engineers and technicians such as this party from Qatar are now regularly seen around Japanese trading and manufacturing offices, receiving instruction of the new technologies that their oil wealth is bringing them, or shopping for more. as Japanese producers continually find ways of orientating their products at the huge new market. One of Japan's more traditional products - the desktop calculator - is now being manufactured with Arabic numerals.

    Japan's hurriedly put-together new middle-eastern diplomatic and economic polices have changed much in Japan's business-world after only 18 months of the post "Oil-shokku" era.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAEE1KGPVTDD307WV857UKMI6RX
    Media URN:
    VLVAEE1KGPVTDD307WV857UKMI6RX
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    23/06/1975
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:02:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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