• Short Summary

    In Argentina, where the first World Cup football match will be played on Thursday (1 June), more than 60,000 tourists and soccer fans have arrived to see the world's top footballers in action.

  • Description

    In Argentina, where the first World Cup football match will be played on Thursday (1 June), more than 60,000 tourists and soccer fans have arrived to see the world's top footballers in action. There have been fears that the price of consumer goods may rise because of the influx of tourists, who are mainly Brazilian, and the Argentine Government has said it does not plan to impose any price controls. Argentina, which has spent more than 500 million dollars in preparation for the World Cup has been suffering from an economic recession, but one trade to benefit from it has been the antique markets. Antique dealers in argentina are expecting to do big business with visiting soccer fans during the next few weeks.

    SYNOPSIS: This plaza in the St. Telmo suburb of Buenos Aires, Began a few years ago as a small religious festival, but has now become a regular antique market. Each Sunday these antique collectors set up their stalls for what is becoming an ever busier day. At first customers were mainly local antique dealers, but gradually the market has expanded to become a major attraction for both tourists and buyers from overseas.

    Many of the products on sale arrived in the country during Argentina's "Golden Years" -- between the 1880's and the 1920's -- when the country's wealth was based on its rural products. In those days almost everything was imported by the successful mercantile businessmen.

    The women of Buenos Aires, always very fashion conscious, often went to Europe with a retinue of maids and servants. Many of the products now on sale were bought in England.

    Among the silver stalls can be found silver plated Sheffield tea sets wand George the third silver cups. Traders are offering them offering them for prices that re often as little as 900 dollars each. It is a treasure cave for the discerning buyer.

    Antique dealers in Argentina say there has been a lot more quality material available recently and they are pleased they have it on hand at a time when there is such an influx of overseas visitors. The dealers say there are two main reasons for the boom in the antique trade. They say new rent laws in Argentina have forced many families to move homes and sell off their furniture. And an economic recession in the industrial sector in Argentina has also affected what were formerly wealthy families and the dealers say many are secretly selling off their treasures.

    Experienced dealers in Buenos Aires say foreign visitors do not foreign visitors do not necessary make bargain buys. Some articles can be bought cheaply when compared with world prices, but it can cost a lot to transfer ownership of goods to another country. However, they do not expect that to put overseas buyers off.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAEDPSIANR50YTIPYZZHEYPKMK5
    Media URN:
    VLVAEDPSIANR50YTIPYZZHEYPKMK5
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    30/05/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:32:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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