• Short Summary

    Thousands of Italians paraded through the streets of Rome on Tuesday night (13 May) to celebrate on overwhelming referendum vote to retain the country's three-year-old Divorce Laws.

  • Description

    1.
    GV AND SV Flags on building and people holding posters. (2 shots)
    0.06

    2.
    SCU Berlingeur on balcony waves to crowd. Speaks to crowd below. Crowd looking up, applauds. (4 shots)
    0.27

    3.
    SV AND GV PAN Crowd at rally in Piazza Navona. (2 shots)
    0.35

    4.
    LV Pannella speaks from platform.
    0.43

    5.
    GV Crowd listening and waving placards.
    0.46

    6.
    GV AND SV Victory parade march. (2 shots)
    1.01

    7.
    SV People watching television broadcast of referendum result. (4 shots)
    1.17

    8.
    SV Bookstall
    1.18

    9.
    SV Man buying newspaper.
    1.20

    10.
    SV People looking at newspaper.
    1.28



    Initials VS 2.12 VS 2.22



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Thousands of Italians paraded through the streets of Rome on Tuesday night (13 May) to celebrate on overwhelming referendum vote to retain the country's three-year-old Divorce Laws. The vote is being seen as a major victory for the Italian Communist party and a blow to both the Catholic Church and the Christian Democratic Party, who were the major forces behind the calling of the referendum.

    Nearly 60 per cent of italy's voters wanted the laws to stay. At a victory rally in Rome, Communist Party leader Enrico Berlingeur remained conciliatory toward the Christian Democrats, who are the major party in Italy's coalition government. However, other Communists were quick to claim that the referendum result was largely due to their campaign to keep the laws. At another rally in the Piazza Navona, radical leader Marco Panella claimed the vote was a victory for progressive forces in Italy.

    Later crowds carrying torches and banners marched through the city to the Porta Pia, a breach in the walls of Rome. It was through this gap that the Piedmontese troops entered in 1870 to make Rome, although a Vatican preserve, capital of a unified Italy.

    Hundreds of people crowded around television sets in shop windows as the results of the referendum began to filter through. Eighty eight per cent of Italy's 37 million voters cast ballots on the issues.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAE5BSLM7MLBAJVUL4WDTG63QIR
    Media URN:
    VLVAE5BSLM7MLBAJVUL4WDTG63QIR
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    14/05/1974
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:28:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment