• Short Summary

    In South Africa, Sotheby's, the world famous auctioneers, have been conducting a sale of wild animals bred on game farms.

  • Description

    1.
    GV: Prospective buyers at open air auction
    0.06

    2.
    CU: Sotheby's auctioneer conducting auction. Speaking in English and Africans
    0.16

    3.
    CU PAN: FROM Sotheby's auction sign to buyers (3 shots)
    0.34

    4.
    GV: Woman buyer making bid
    0.37

    5.
    CU: Man making bid and auction in progress
    0.48

    6.
    SV: Prospective buyers looking at animals in enclosure
    0.51

    7.
    TOP VIEW: Zebras in pen
    0.56

    8.
    LV: People looking into pens. (2 shots)
    1.04

    9.
    CU ZOOM INTO: Pen with white-tailed guns
    1.07

    10.
    GV: Young ostriches
    1.17

    11.
    TOP VIEW: long horned elands
    1.20

    12.
    CU ZOOM OUT: From young deer
    1.30

    13.
    TOP SHOT: Pair of white rhinos
    1.39




    Initials RH/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: In South Africa, Sotheby's, the world famous auctioneers, have been conducting a sale of wild animals bred on game farms. It's the second sale of its kind, the first having been held as an experiment a year ago.

    SYNOPSIS: This year's sale was held on Wednesday (14 May) on the Maccauvlei game farm, near Vereeniging. It attracted a large crowd of buyers, mostly game rangers and farmers, and bidding for the four hundred and fifty animals on offer, was high.

    The sale of wild animals is a new departure for Sotheby's, who are usually associated with Old Master paintings and antiques. The company conducted last year's auction, which was so successful the representative said "We'll be back". And so they returned for this year's sale.

    Most of the game was bought for safari parks and game farms, where tourists will have a chance to hunt and shoot them later. But the organisers of the sale also pointed out that the promotion of game farming in South Africa was vital in assuring the preservation of certain spices.

    The animals, closely scrutinised by the experts who came to bid, were not only from area nearby, but had been brought in from South West Africa.

    Last year the sale raised around 115,000 rand (136,000 dollars), and prices this year were even higher. Various species of deer were amongst the most popular investments. Many of the local farms breed them for venison as the land is not really suitable for beef cattle. Deer require almost no maintence, thus the cost of producing venison makes economic sense. Other animals, like the famous white rhino, have a more secure future, in the protection of zoos and safari parks.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAE4HGZ4RN86PS5JY0728TONMBG
    Media URN:
    VLVAE4HGZ4RN86PS5JY0728TONMBG
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    17/05/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:42:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment