• Short Summary

    While negotiations for a political settlement for the future of Namibia (South West Africa) continue, a novel United Nations experiment is already training Namibians as administrators to run the government when their country becomes independent.

  • Description

    1.
    CU & LV Symbol of U.N. Institute for Namibia, and EXTERIOR Institute building (2 shots)
    0.15

    2.
    LV PAN EXTERIOR Institute
    0.27

    3.
    LV PAN INT Students in class
    0.40

    4.
    LV & CU Students in library (2 shots)
    0.55

    5.
    CU & SV Secretary in office (2 shots)
    1.04

    6.
    SV Student receiving treatment in infirmary
    1.23

    7.
    LV EXT Students' quarters
    1.26

    8.
    SV PAN INT Student in his quarters
    1.33



    Initials BB/1530



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: While negotiations for a political settlement for the future of Namibia (South West Africa) continue, a novel United Nations experiment is already training Namibians as administrators to run the government when their country becomes independent.

    SYNOPSIS: The training is carried out at the United Nations Institute for Namibia, a special centre set up in Lusaka, capital of Zambia. It was officially opened by President Kaunda eighteen months ago. More than 25 countries and other United Nations agencies contribute to the costs of running the Institute. Last year the budget was just over 2 1/2 million dollars (U.S.).

    Drawing on the experience of the past, when the transition to independence proved difficult for many colonial and dependent territories because they lacked qualified people to take over the administration, the United Nations, which has special responsibilities in Namibia, decided to act ahead of the event. The Institute was the result. Here students are trained in a broad range of subjects, such as economics, public administration and English, which would help to make a new government function properly. Many of the students who attend the Institute are refugees. It's estimated there are more than 3,500 Namibian refugees in Zambia alone.

    The institute was designed for offer full facilities for 75 students, but the courses are so popular, that enrolment is now over 200, and there are growing problems of overcrowding. There is another, more fundamental problem which faces the students. Instruction at the Institute is in English. But as most of the students received their earlier education in the Bantu language, special emphasis has to be given to the study of English.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADZDLRIQF7OBQ70EHRYKP5AMOI
    Media URN:
    VLVADZDLRIQF7OBQ70EHRYKP5AMOI
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    23/02/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:34:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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