• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: The Soviet Union still has the world's biggest energy resources of all kinds.

  • Description

    1.
    GV PULL BACK TO LV Cabin cruiser on river.
    0.10

    2.
    SV PAN Model of hydro scheme.
    0.16

    3.
    SV PAN DOWN Pylons and electrical equipment.
    0.24

    4.
    INTERIOR GV Generating room.
    0.30

    5.
    EXTERIOR SV PAN Power station with two female workers. (2 SHOTS)
    0.40

    6.
    TILT UP PAN DOWN, SV PAN UP TO GV Section of power station and reservoir. (2 SHOTS)
    0.50

    7.
    SV PULL BACK TO GV Swirling waters by power station.
    1.01

    8.
    GV PAN Night scene of power station.
    1.09

    9.
    GV PAN Mountainous region with seagulls nesting on rocks. (4 SHOTS)
    1.36

    10.
    GV Reservoir with hydro generator.
    1.39

    11.
    INTERIOR GV Control panel with worker.
    1.46

    12.
    EXTERIOR GV Swirling waters with floating ice. (2 shots)
    1.58

    13.
    INTERIOR SV Workers within power station. (2 SHOTS)
    2.10

    14.
    SV & CU Workers monitoring controls and equipment. (4 SHOTS)
    2.26

    15.
    SV & CU Technician examining concrete bricks.
    2.42




    Initials JS





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: The Soviet Union still has the world's biggest energy resources of all kinds. The soaring cost of oil on world markets has brought into increasing prominence alternative sources of energy. The mighty rivers of Siberia -- the Ob, its two tributaries the Irtysh and Tobol, the Yenisei and Lena -- are an enormous source of energy. It has been estimated that the Siberian water passes can produce annually more than 750 billion kilowatts of electric power. The most powerful hydro-electric station in the world -- the Krasnoyarsk -- is fittingly on the most powerful Soviet river, the Yenisei in central Siberia.

    SYNOPSIS: The Soviet Union's oil supply is growing increasingly tight and coal production is beginning to recede. The future lies with rivers like this. When the Yenisei is flooded it carries up to 180 thousand cubic metres a second. To harness this enormous power Soviet scientists designed the world's largest hydro-electric power station -- the Krasnoyarsk.

    These twelve turbine-generators are the largest machines of their kind in existence. They produce 508 thousand kilowatts of electricity each and are turned by water falling from a height of 93 metres (102 yards).

    There are numerous advantages too, The station is fully competitive with the most efficient steam stations and the net cost is three to four times lower than thermal stations. The water is constantly renewable and totally free from pollution. Reservoirs are used to regulate the flow and prevent flooding.

    At night eh station stands out for miles in the vast expenses of the remote region.

    The whole area is ideal for hydro-electric power. Mountains provide the fast flow and the plains provide good building sites. The Soviets have embarked on an ambitious energy programme to develop the water resources of Siberia. Seven interconnected power stations are planned with an aggregate capacity of about 30 million kilowatts a year. The stations are all to be built on the Yenisei itself excluding its tributaries.

    Soviet energy policy has kept prices to consumers and to industry below world levels but there are signs that this may have to change. Oil production is growing increasingly tight and coal output is declining. That's why the vast energy resources of Siberia have become so important. Natural gas and hydro-electricity continue to expand. There is also an ambitious pan to divert the might Siberian rivers down to the deserts of Central Asia.

    Another important experiment is the construction of this power station at Kislogubskaya on the coast of the Barentsovo Sea sixty miles from Mumansk. It harnesses the power of the tides. Daily routine work at the station can be performed comfortably by one duty engineer. It has been constructed of a new type of concrete which can withstand the freezing arctic temperatures for nearly 16 years instead of one year the life-span of more conventional frost proof concrete.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADWS0B6F6ONVGEIXDYQ4QED24
    Media URN:
    VLVADWS0B6F6ONVGEIXDYQ4QED24
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    10/08/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:42:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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