• Short Summary

    Several major industries were hit by strikes in Bangkok on Friday (2 January) as the Federation of Labour Unions of Thailand (FLUT) began its protest against Government plans to increase the price of rice.

  • Description

    Several major industries were hit by strikes in Bangkok on Friday (2 January) as the Federation of Labour Unions of Thailand (FLUT) began its protest against Government plans to increase the price of rice.

    There were slow-downs and strikes by dockers, electricity and telephone workers; and at the Bangkok waterworks, industrial action caused fears of a water shortage. Production also stopped at two plants making Thailand's most popular brands of beer and whisky.

    The Government plans to increase consumer prices of rice, Thailand's staple food, from 16 January as part of a scheme to guarantee a fixed minimum return for farmers.

    Prime Minister Kukrit Pramoj said he did not think the situation would become serious and dismissed speculation that troops might be used to man essential services. However, Mr. Pramoj may be proved wrong as FLUT is planning a general strike from Monday (5 January) and 200,000 workers from 54 trade unions are expected to join the stoppage. The Government has already declared that any such strike would be illegal on the grounds that no labour dispute is involved.

    So far, the partial strikes and go-slows have particularly effected the country's main port of Klong Toey. Rice, maize and other export cargoes are beginning to rot on the docks as stevedores refuse to load them.

    SYNOPSIS: Several major industries were hit by strikes and slowdowns in Bangkok on Friday. Dockers, electricity and telephone workers took industrial action. Production also stopped at two plants making Thailand's most popular brands of beer and whisky, and a go-slow at the waterworks caused fears of a water shortage.

    The stoppages have been called to protest against a Government plan to increase the consumer price of rice, Thailand's staple food, to guarantee farmers a fixed minimum return.

    Prime Minister Kukrit Pramoj said he did not think the strike would become serious and dismissed speculation that troops would be brought in to man essential services. However, Mr. Pramoj may be proved wrong as a general strike to begin on Monday has been called by the Federation for Labour Unions of Thailand (FLUT). Organisers expect about two hundred thousand workers from fifty-four unions to join the strike.

    So far, Thailand's main port of Klong Toey has been worst hit by the strikes and stoppages. Rice, maize and other exports are beginning to rot on the docks as stevedores refuse to load them.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADU4PSRQIY27CTU1ITLI0EKQKF
    Media URN:
    VLVADU4PSRQIY27CTU1ITLI0EKQKF
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    04/01/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:18:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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