• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: In the Netherlands, the European Common Market nations have called for an urgent response to Poland's request for more food aid.

  • Description

    1.
    GV EXTERIOR Council offices of Warsaw's Mokotow district
    0.05

    2.
    GV EXTERIOR Council offices of Warsaw's Mokotow district
    0.05

    3.
    CU INTERIOR Rationing coupons
    0.08

    4.
    CU & SV Officials sorting ration stamps (5 shots)
    0.51

    5.
    CU ZOOM TO SV Official counting out ration stamps
    1.01

    6.
    GV EXTERIOR Trucks with pigs at meat factory (2 shots)
    1.09

    7.
    SV Pigs being unloaded (2 shots)
    1.20

    8.
    SV INTERIOR Pigs being led to slaughter (2 shots)
    1.30

    9.
    SV Pig being slaughtered
    1.39

    10.
    GV Pigs hanging on conveyor belt, being prepared
    1.46

    11.
    GV Joints being processed (3 shots)
    2.05

    12.
    SV & CU Ham diced (3 shots)
    2.13

    13.
    SV Ham weighed and canned (3 shots)
    2.35

    14.
    GV PAN Crates of ham in warehouse (2 shots)
    2.51

    15.
    (LIBRARY FILM) GV EXTERIOR Queue outside butcher
    2.54

    16.
    SV INTERIOR Customer with ration stamps and meat wrapped
    3.12




    Initials BB





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: In the Netherlands, the European Common Market nations have called for an urgent response to Poland's request for more food aid. At the end of a two-day meeting at Maastricht on Tuesday (24 March), EEC leaders also agreed to intensify their role in an international financial rescue plan for Poland. Their decision comes at a time when the Polish economic situation is getting steadily worse. Sugar rations have been cut and plans for meet rationing have been drawn up -- a measure which many Poles think may be in force for years rather than the promised months.

    SYNOPSIS: The rationing of meat in Poland will start on April the first and is planned to last until the end of June. The meat coupons are stamped "Luty" the Polish word for "February, but the government postponed their issue for two months. Nine types of coupons are being issued. The most generous of these allows five kilograms (11 pounds) of meat a month to pregnant women, breast-feeding mothers and coal-miners.

    The Poles are reported to be sceptical that the promised quantities will in fact be available. And there's also the question of whether rationing will end the opportunities for black marketeering, panic buying and hoarding. The basic cause of the Polish crisis is the seriously depressed state of its agriculture. Food price rises sparked off the first wave of strikes last July. And so did the earlier political upheavals of 1970 and 1976.

    Poland has asked the European community for a further 50,000 tonnes of meat and 30,000 tonnes of butter. Yet this richly fertile country has traditionally been a big exporter of food. In the 1950s it was exporting many thousands of tonnes of pork every year. Now it imports more than it ships out. The Polish Ministry of Agriculture says this is because of excessive consumption and not enough production Food prices may now be raised dramatically -- as much as 140 per cent in the case of pork.

    This meat factory at Kolo, in the Polish district of Konin, was built in 1974 by a West Berlin organisation. The factory's export earnings will repay the cost of its construction. Its shipments to the United States, Britain, West Germany and Sweden account for 10 per cent of the plant's entire production. It produced 57,000 tonnes of meat in 1980 but the target this year has been reduced to 43,600 tonnes. The workers here are all members of the independent trade union Solidarity, which has been angered by the country's food shortages.

    The Polish government plans sweeping agricultural reforms to revive its depressed economy. State co-operative farms will be given new autonomy, wages will be linked to profits, and the distribution of resources between state and private farmers will be equalized.

    The Poles are facing food rationing for the second time within four months. Ration cards were distributed throughout the country in December to stretch meagre supplies of meat, sausage and butter for the Christmas holidays. This year, Poland will concentrate on solving its agricultural problems -- the key to its economic recovery.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADT0QW9FK3XT9KV4IVY9U7PD0E
    Media URN:
    VLVADT0QW9FK3XT9KV4IVY9U7PD0E
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    25/03/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:13:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment