• Short Summary

    On the night of the November full moon, hundreds of thousands of beautiful offerings fashioned from banana leaves, are launched on the rivers, ponds and lakes of the kingdom of Thailand.

  • Description

    On the night of the November full moon, hundreds of thousands of beautiful offerings fashioned from banana leaves, are launched on the rivers, ponds and lakes of the kingdom of Thailand. The Festival of Loy Krathong, which has been celebrated in this way for centuries, took place this year on November the 10th - the twelfth month in the lunar calendar.

    Thousands of people lined the banks of every waterway in the country as the moon rose to watch the beautiful craft float by, loaded with lighted candles, joss-sticks, coins and betel-nuts. These are the offerings to "mother water".

    Many of the festivals and ceremonies of present day Thailand originated in the days of the pomp and splendour of the ancient Court of Siam. Most like the Festival to Loy Krathong, were related to the Buddhist religion, but over the years, most of the religious significance has disappeared.

    In the Thai capital, Bangkok, the leaf cup "Kathongs" begin to appear in the market a few days before the festival. Many have become very elaborate, shaped like birds or boats, but in the country, the people still make their own "Kathongs", simple shapes filled with flowers.

    The people of Bangkok went to Lumpinee Park or Dusit Zoo lake to watch the "Kathongs". The waters there are stagnant, and little boys are employed to launch the Kathongs" away from the shore. Many of the older people believe that Loy Krathong is an act of repentance, an apology to the Mother of Waters for the way man has misused and polluted her gift.

    SYNOPSIS: In Bangkok, Krathong, fashioned from banana leaves, were sold for the festival of Loy Krathong last Saturday. This Thai festival has been celebrated for centuries on the night of the full moon in the twelfth lunar month.

    The festival, like many others, originated in the days of the pomp and splendour of the ancient Court of Siam.

    The tiny offerings are made to the "Mother of Waters". Each craft carries candles, joss-sticks, coins or betel-nuts.

    The festival, like most others in Thailand, is related to the Buddhist religion, but over the years it has lost most of its religious significance.

    Where the water is stagnant, someone has to get a ducking to ensure that the offerings float away from the shore.

    Many of the older people believe that Loy Krathong is an act of repentance; an apology to the Mother of Waters for the way man has misused and polluted her gift.

    As the Krathongs fade away, the people raise their hands in prayer for their fortunes.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADQKETFEKM2G9VV4OSBHWYS0BN
    Media URN:
    VLVADQKETFEKM2G9VV4OSBHWYS0BN
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    13/11/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:33:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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