• Short Summary

    In separate news conferences at the end of Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko's five-day official visit to Japan, Mr.

  • Description

    In separate news conferences at the end of Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko's five-day official visit to Japan, Mr. Gromyko and Japanese Prime Minister Takeo Miki gave differing views on the so-called "anti-hegemony" clause in a proposed Sino-Japanese peace treaty.

    Both conferences tool place in Tokyo on Tuesday (13 January). The Soviet Minister made his displeasure over the clause quite clear. Anti-hegemony means opposition to domination by a state and clause is reported to be viewed by Moscow as being anti-Soviet in its implications.

    Mr. Gromyko refused to discuss another controversial issue -- Japan's claim to four Soviet-held north Pacific islands -- which has held up negotiations for a Soviet-Japanese peace treaty.

    At his conference, Mr. Miki said that his Government did not regard the anti-hegemony clause as specifically directed against the Soviet Union. According to Mr. Miki, Japan will pursue its relations with China with the intention of concluding a peace treaty "at the earliest possible moment" -- and without the interference of a "third party".

    On the subject of the Soviet-held islands Mr. Miki reiterated his Government's position that they must be returned to Japan before a treaty between the two counties can be ratified.

    SYNOPSIS: Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko finished a five-day official visit to Japan on Tuesday and before he left Tokyo he told newsmen about his views on some of the matters discussed with Japanese leaders.

    Mr. Gromyko made his displeasure over the so-called "anti-hegemony" clause in a proposed peace treaty between Japan and China quite clear. Anti-hegemony means opposition to domination by a state and the clause is reported to be viewed by Moscow as being anti-Soviet in its implications. Mr. Gromyko refused to comment, however, on the disagreement between Japan and the Soviet Union over four Soviet-held north Pacific island. This has help up negotiations for a Soviet-Japanese peace treaty.

    Also on Tuesday newsmen gathered at the Foreign Correspondents Club in Tokyo to hear the views of Japanese Prime Minister Mr. Takeo Miki ... who said that his Government did not regard the anti-hegemony clause as specifically directed against the Soviet Union.

    According to Mr. Miki Japan will pursue it s relations with China with the intention of concluding a peace treaty "at the earliest possible moment" -- and without the interference of a "third party". On the Soviet-held islands, Mr. Miki re-stated his Government's position that they must be returned to Japan before a treaty between the two counties can be ratified.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADQ5VL4QKPOPA2UJ44UA9F7PNR
    Media URN:
    VLVADQ5VL4QKPOPA2UJ44UA9F7PNR
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    14/01/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:36:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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