• Short Summary

    Pollution in the air over Argentina's capital, Buenos Aires, is among the worst of any capital city in South America.

  • Description

    1.
    TGV PAN Buenos Aires Port and PAN TO city buildings and smog hanging over city (3 shots)
    24

    2.
    CTV Cars down main street.
    29

    3.
    LV Factories on river side. (2 shots)
    37

    4.
    GV AND LV Factory chimneys pouring out smoke. (2 shots)
    46

    5.
    GV AND SV Heavy traffic along road leaving dense exhaust fumes. (3 shots)
    1.05

    6.
    SV Heavy lorries along road emitting fumes. (2 shots)
    1.26

    7.
    GV Jet plane taking off from airport.
    1.38



    Initials VS 16.20 VS 16.35



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Pollution in the air over Argentina's capital, Buenos Aires, is among the worst of any capital city in South America. The problem is created by the large amount of industry in and around Buenos Aires, the incinerators for flats and private dwellings, and, increasingly cars and lorries.

    Experts from the Argentine Ministry of Social Welfare have estimated that the 1,120 tons of rubbish burned each day in the city produces eleven tons of soot. So, each day, that eleven tons of soot falls over the capital.

    But that is not all the rubbish produces. It also sends into the air 44.8 tons of carbon monoxide, 0.28 tons of nitrogen oxide, and 0.168 tons of sulphur monoxide. The authorities believe that if they could encourage the owners of independent incinerators to install an auxiliary burner, then these amounts could be cut drastically.

    It is estimated that 77 per cent of incinerator owners do not have auxiliary burners fitted, and, as the city has one incinerator for every eighty inhabitants, that means a large amount of pollution.

    So Buenos Aires has joined the sad string of major Wester cities that are slowly choking themselves with the poisoned air of their own making. Few of them have followed the notable example of London in the United Kingdom, which introduced a Clean Air Act as far back as 1956. Since then Londoners, as well as the inhabitants of Britain's other industrial towns and cities, have enjoyed 50 per cent more winter sunshine, an 80 per cent reduction in smoke, and the total elimination of smogs -- or black fogs.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADP0C327HN3RQOQX5T7RU03RZ2
    Media URN:
    VLVADP0C327HN3RQOQX5T7RU03RZ2
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    01/05/1975
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:38:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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