• Short Summary

    The tanks are off the streets and life is taking on a semblance of normality in Kabul, capital of Afghanistan, after the military coup a week and a half ago that ousted the government of President Muhammed Daoud.

  • Description

    The tanks are off the streets and life is taking on a semblance of normality in Kabul, capital of Afghanistan, after the military coup a week and a half ago that ousted the government of President Muhammed Daoud. There is much dispute over the extent of the bloodshed in the coup which brought to power a left-wing government, headed by President Nur Mohammed Tarakki, dubbed by the Soviet Press as Afghanistan's "leading revolutionary". Last week, in his first press conference, President Tarakki denied his government was communist and said it intended to take a non-aligned and independent peace-seeking policy. Its relations with both the Soviet Union and the West wold be determined by economic and other aid it received.

    SYNOPSIS: In Kabul, it is business as usual, though for most people the nature of the regime they now live under remains something of a mystery. When newspapers appeared for the first time since the coup, they carried photographs of Mr Tarakki and other party leaders and everywhere there was a scramble for copies. Informed sources say that 65-year-old Mr Tarakki is a moderate who believes it would be impossible for Afghanistan still one of the world's most underdeveloped countries, to function as an orthodox Communist state under present conditions.

    Mr Tarakki said in his first press conference that Afghan's revolution would be a unique one, without guidance from Moscow or other centres. But his government is dominated by members of the staunchly pro-Soviet Democratic Khalq (People's) Party and his two right hand men, Babrak Karamal and Hafizullah Amir, both Ministers, are said to be far more rigid ideologues. The Soviet Union, which denies involvement in the coup led the world in giving the new regime diplomatic recognition.

    As apparent stability returns to Afghanistan, more nations have recognised the revolutionary government. Britain and the United States soon followed Moscow's example. President Tarakki's denials of a Moscow-Kabul axis go some way to dispelling widespread fears in diplomatic circles that a strongly pro-Soviet government in Afghanistan could give the Soviet Union a major strategic opening in the region. So far, pronouncements from the new government have been of the broadest kind and diplomatic sources are waiting anxiously for the first concrete policy statement to judge how radical the regime might be.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADLSRU5TCBDN9BHY9PRBFD8OOQ
    Media URN:
    VLVADLSRU5TCBDN9BHY9PRBFD8OOQ
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    08/05/1978
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:48:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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