• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: Britain's Sebastian Coe narrowly missed breaking the world 1500 metres record at an international meeting in Stockholm, Sweden, on Tuesday (7 July).

  • Description

    1.
    GV PAN Plucknett throwing discus for world record, discus landing
    0.12

    2.
    GV PAN Steward running to measure distance
    0.22

    3.
    SV TILT DOWN Plucknett posing for photographers
    0.28

    4.
    GV PAN Start of men's 1500 metres with American James Robinson taking lead
    1.11

    5.
    GV PAN End of race, Coe in last lap, overtaking Robinson (1.22) crossing line (1.42) to win, cheering
    1.55




    Initials BB





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: Britain's Sebastian Coe narrowly missed breaking the world 1500 metres record at an international meeting in Stockholm, Sweden, on Tuesday (7 July). However, the world discus record did fall during the meeting.

    SYNOPSIS: American athlete Ben Plucknett broke his own world discus record with a throw that reached 72.34 metres.

    With his fourth throw, the American easily surpassed his old record of 71.20 metres, set in California in May this year.

    His effort in Stockholm was more than three metres better than his nearest rival.

    A total of 55 world records have fallen at meetings at the Stockholm stadium since 1912 -- and another was threatened when Britain's Sebastian Coe started in the invitation 1500 metres. The promoters brought together a talented field with the testing pace he would need to achieve his ambition of breaking the 3 minute 30 second barrier for the distance. In the early stages, American runner James Robinson -- the second fastest 800 metres runner after Coe himself -- obliged with a speedy performance.

    Coe had felt confident he could break the record with the right conditions and early pace. However, although two seconds inside the record at the 1200 metre mark, he was unable to keep up the pace after he overtook Robinson. He finished at 3 minutes 31.95 seconds, just over half a second outside the record set by fellow Briton Steve Ovett in Koblenz, East Germany, last August. That record stands at 3 minutes 31.36 seconds.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADJMVTTCI6GH4MHCULULOO6OFM
    Media URN:
    VLVADJMVTTCI6GH4MHCULULOO6OFM
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    08/07/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:56:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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