• Short Summary

    Lockheed Tristar Airbus, in Europe for the Paris Air Show, on Saturday visited the Derby Headquarters of the Company which built its engines, Roles Royce.

  • Description

    Lockheed Tristar Airbus, in Europe for the Paris Air Show, on Saturday visited the Derby Headquarters of the Company which built its engines, Roles Royce.

    Rolls Royce workers and Derby civic dignitaries turned out to see the aircraft when it touched down at Derby Airport. This film was shot by the BBC.

    It was the Tristar's RB-211 engines which caused the bankruptcy last February of the Rolls Royce Company,when it was unable to meet the development costs of the engine contract.

    Now the nationalized Rolls Royce Company, the British Government and the people of Derby hope that the American Congress will guarantee production funds for the Lockheed Company's Tristar programma.

    Lockheed-California this week announced that pilots from Delta Airlines, Pacific Southwest, Trans World Airlines and British European Airways will fly the Tristar during June.

    The jet is also being tested by air crews from All Nippon Airways of Japan and Air Canada. The aircraft visiting Europe is the first to fly in the colours of Eastern Airlines - largest purchasers of the Tristar with over 50 on order - who recently re confirmed their order and their confidence in the Rolls Royce engine.

    SYNOPSIS: At the Paris Air Show this week the Lockheed Tri-Star has had to compete for public attention with supersonic airliners like the Anglo-French Concorde and the Russian TU 144. But on Saturday it had a specially interested audience when it flew to Derby in the English Midlands to show itself off to the people who built its engines -- the workers at Rolls Royce.

    It was the development costs on the Tri-Star's RB 211 engines which were mainly responsible for the bankruptcy last February of Rolls Royce. Now the Company is nationalized, and the people of Derby hope that Congress will guarantee production funds for the Lockheed Company's Tri-Star programme.

    If this world-famous British company is to gut on its feet again, then the Tri-Star and its engines must get backing from some source. And if all goes well Tri-Star will appear in regular service next year. This particular aircraft had only flown 30 hours before Lockheed decided it should cress the Atlantic for the Paris Air Show, and some of its passenger area was still packed with electronic testing equipment.

    The Rolls Royce workers and civic dignitaries of Derby were keen to have a close look at the aircraft which promises them so much. And more Rolls Royce workers will see Tri-Star on Monday when the aircraft visits other factories in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

    This aircraft's engines left Derby at about the time Rolls Royce crashed. Now they're flying -- perhaps a good omen for the new Rolls Royce company. Another cheering note for them is the announcement from Lockheed that pilots from British European Airways and a number of potential American buyers of Tri-Star will be flying the aircraft this moth.

    If their verdict on it is as good as that of U.S. astronaut Frank Borman, who called it "a real winner," the people of Derby will be well pleased.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVADGZ3QQ3V7TAAK7NOMQQN4CL0
    Media URN:
    VLVADGZ3QQ3V7TAAK7NOMQQN4CL0
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    05/06/1971
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:55:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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