• Short Summary

    President Ahmadou Ahidjo of Cameroun, who arrived for a four-day official visit to France on Monday (19 July), said there could be no question of dialogue with South Africa as long as apartheid remained in force.

  • Description

    President Ahmadou Ahidjo of Cameroun, who arrived for a four-day official visit to France on Monday (19 July), said there could be no question of dialogue with South Africa as long as apartheid remained in force.

    SYNOPSIS: The leader of the West African nation, once administered by France, was greeted on his arrival at Paris' Orly Airport by French President Valery Giscard D'Estaing. President Ahidjo, who was accompanied by his wife, arrived from the Cote D'Azur--a French Mediterranean pleasure resort--where he had been on a private holiday.

    Security precautions at the airport were apparently light, despite the presence of two heads of state and some cabinet ministers. On greeting the French leader, President Ahidjo recalled his first official visit to France 12 years ago--when he was welcomed by President Charles de Gaulle. Paying tribute to the late General, President Ahidjo said he had played an historic role in favouring independence for Cameroun and other African nations. East Cameroun, then a United Nations Trusteeship Territory run by France, became independent in January 1960. It was joined by West Cameroun, a British-administered Trust Territory, to form a federal republic the following year. President Ahidjo had led the country since independence. The federal republic finally gave way to a united republic in 1972.

    President Ahidjo made his attack on South Africa in an interview report carried by the French newspaper Le Monde. Flatly refuting the idea of dialogue while apartheid remained, he said Prime Minister John Vorster bore full responsibility for the recent riots in black South African townships in which about 180 people died. He also attacked what he called the hypocrisy of apartheid -- separate development -- because while the South African Government advocated separatism it tried to force its own language into black schools, he said. It was the introduction of the official Afrikaans language into black schools which sparked off the rioting, he said.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAD9X1NP0FTKTVVAJRV8V9QKR6T
    Media URN:
    VLVAD9X1NP0FTKTVVAJRV8V9QKR6T
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    20/07/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:52:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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