• Short Summary

    An energetic construction programme initiated by the Singapore Housing and Development Board and aimed at providing low cost housing for the island's two million inhabitants is building homes at a rate of one every 35 minutes.

  • Description

    An energetic construction programme initiated by the Singapore Housing and Development Board and aimed at providing low cost housing for the island's two million inhabitants is building homes at a rate of one every 35 minutes. That works out at 40 new flats a day, or a total of 17,000 a year. And, already ahead of its original programme, the Board has set its sights on a figure of 20,000 for next year.

    Under this scheme, the old shanties surrounding the Malay kampongs and the cluttered old dwellings of the Chinatown districts are razed to the ground. The inhabitants are promptly settled in new apartment blocks. But despite the speed of the building, demand is outrunning supply. The Housing Board say that some people may have to wait two years before the programme can catch up with them.

    SYNOPSIS: The Singapore Government is engaged upon a long ??? rehousing programme for is crowded population of two million.

    An energetic construction scheme begun after the island gained independence twelve years ago has completed 120,000 dwellings. That's five times more than the total erected during the previous thirty years of British administration. This rates the housing programme as one of the island's most impressive achievements. Gradually, the shanties surrounding the teeming Malay kampongs - vastly overcrowded and unhygienic - are disappearing as new constructions take over.

    The old homes that typify China-town, too, are going the same way. They are razed to the ground, and the inhabitants moved into their newly built, very modern homes.

    The rate at which the new units are going up is phenomenal. One new flat is built every thirty five minutes. Thats 40 new homes a day, or 17,000 a year. Even with this speed of growth, the Singapore Housing and Development Board are not entirely satisfied, however. Though they are ahead of their initial estimates, they hope next year to increase the rate to 20,000 over twelve months. Already, the Board is landlord to 600,000 of the island's two million inhabitants. For their new homes, they pay the board a minimum monthly rent of ten American dollars. Compared with low-cost housing elsewhere in Asia and its mushrooming population, Singapore's project is providing its people with homes which are both comfortable and spacious, and Singapore's politicians refer to them as gracious living. But despite the impressive figures demand is inevitably ahead of supply. The Housing Board says some applicants may have to wait two years yet before the programme catches up with them.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAD9P63C5PI2J41KFQTM201FVPH
    Media URN:
    VLVAD9P63C5PI2J41KFQTM201FVPH
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    24/06/1971
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:59:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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