• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION: Author and explorer Tim Severin sailed into Singapore Harbour on Thursday (11 June) aboard a dhow held together by coconut rope.

  • Description

    1.
    SV PAN DOWN Omani flag TO ship tied up at wharf (2 shots)
    0.13

    2.
    LV & CU Tim Severin talking with newsmen (2 shots)
    0.26

    3.
    CU Crew member watches as others haul on ropes to raise sail (5 shots)
    0.50

    4.
    GV Ship at sea
    1.03

    5.
    SV & CU Crew preparing food (3 shots)
    1.12

    6.
    SV Water containers
    1.15

    7.
    GV Ship at sea
    1.28




    Initials BB





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: INTRODUCTION: Author and explorer Tim Severin sailed into Singapore Harbour on Thursday (11 June) aboard a dhow held together by coconut rope. The dhow is not ordinary boat but a hand-made replica of Sinbad the Sailor's ninth century ship. Tim and a crew of 25 set out in mid-November on & 10,000 kilometres (6,000 mile) trip from Oman to China to recreative with historical precision the legendary voyages of Sinbad. On Thursday the dhow sailed serenely into Singapore harbour before starting the last and most difficult leg of the voyage to Canton. The typhoon season was reach Canton -- depending on the weather.

    SYNOPSIS: Severin conceived the idea of the voyage while completing his passage across the Atlantic in a leather boat. That was his first epic adventure which he called the Brendan voyage emulating a sixth century monk St. Brendan. Sinbad is the most famous sailor in the world. Immortalised in the Arabian Nights, his legendary ventures may have been versions of actual exploits.

    Whatever the truth behind the stories there's no denying the grace and beauty of the dhow called Sohar after the town in Oman where Sinbad was believed to have originated. It was launched in Muscat Harbour in late October. The main sail canvas takes some raising -- it spreads to 1.858 square metres (20,000 square feet).

    Omani shipwrights took 30 months to construct the vessel. Six-hundred and fifty kilometres (400 miles) of coconut twine hold it together. It has no engine and is made of material used thousands of years ago.

    Life aboard the 26 metre (86 foot) dhow was much the same as it was for the early traders. Food was fresh fish, fruit, nuts, dates and rice. Navigation was by the stars and a chart of small ancient tablets strung on a cord. Now she leaves all land behind and sails out into the South China Sea for the most difficult leg of her voyage.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAD8PFFHEUR8MLH9V0T3BLYMUKL
    Media URN:
    VLVAD8PFFHEUR8MLH9V0T3BLYMUKL
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    13/06/1981
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:29:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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