• Short Summary

    A fourth generation of boat material may be on the way. First we had wood,?

  • Description


    300-POUND MAN RIDES IN CUT-IN-HALF BOAT
    0.08


    WATER SKIER IN ACTION, TOWED BY PLASTIC MOTORBOAT
    0.19


    SHEET OF PLASTIC PULLED TOWARD OVEN; YOUNG MAN AT CONTROL PANEL
    0.28


    INSIDE INFRA-RED OVEN; SHEET ENTERS AND LEAVES OVEN
    0.38


    BOAT MOLD IS LOWERED: HOT PLASTIC EMERGES FROM OVEN AND MOVES TOWARD MOLD
    0.48


    VIEW OF SAGGING PLASTIC . . . BOAT MOLD ENTERS THE PLASTIC . . . PLASTIC IS QUICKLY SUCKED INTO BOAT FORM
    1.00


    TWO HULL SKINS ARE BONDED TOGETHER IN RED MACHINE; LIQUID FOAM POURS INTO MACHINE THROUGH TUBE
    1.08


    MAN AND WOMAN FINISHING BOATS IN ASSEMBLY LINE
    1.12


    FINISHED BOAT IN ACTION IS BANGED AGAINST DOCK... RIDES OVER SANDBAR AND BACK INTO THE WATER
    1.26



    Initials



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: A fourth generation of boat material may be on the way. First we had wood, then aluminum, then fiberglass. Now a sturdier but less expensive line of boats will be "baked" in an oven. They're made of a foam-reinforced plastic called "Cycolac ABS." To show their unsinkability, a salesman in Minnesota literally cut one of the boats in half.

    With the exception of the half-boat, all those craft were 15 feet long. We all remember when boats that size were made entirely by hand. But now they'll be molded faster and cheaper on an assembly line. And soon it may be possible for the average American to have a plastic boat parked in the driveway, right next to the family car.

    SYNOPSIS: Tom Baxter will not start a new sport of "half-boating." But his 300 pounds do prove the material stays afloat!
    Water skiers find the vessel very stable when it's not cut in half. There can be more boat for less money because of the unusual way the hulls are made.

    ...Sheets of plastic become finished boat hulls in less than an hour, with the help of three men and a computer.

    In an infra-red oven the plastic is heated till it's soft. This same method can be used to mold automobile bodies and houses.

    When the hot plastic leaves the oven it is met by a boat-shaped mold. The technique was created by Borg-Warner, which also made the plastic and the new equipment.

    Now look closely at the sagging plastic. Soon a high-pressure vacuum will suck it up against the mold...And suddenly it's a boat hull!
    Here the inner and outer skins of the hull are bonded together with a filling of plastic foam.

    Then the boats are finished in various styles.

    The plastic hull is virtually indestructible. The builder of these boats, Kayot, has used every material through the years and says this new one is the toughest ever.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAD8K4KAPOURCLN3DWLGUFXFH5F
    Media URN:
    VLVAD8K4KAPOURCLN3DWLGUFXFH5F
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    13/07/1970
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:28:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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