• Short Summary

    On November 23, at Cape Canaveral in the United States, the space shuttle was being prepared for a November 28 launch to carry the European Space Lab into orbit.

  • Description

    CAPE CANAVERAL, USA (NBC)


    1.
    LV & GV Shuttle on launch pad. (3 SHOTS)
    0.11

    2.
    GV PAN Shuttle being moved to launch pad. (3 SHOTS)
    0.23

    3.
    SV & GV Defective booster rockets. (2 SHOTS)
    0.28

    4.
    GV Night scene shuttle launch pad. (3 SHOTS)
    0.35

    5.
    SV INTERIOR Control room.
    0.40

    6.
    SV & GV Commander John Young putting on space suit. (2 SHOTS)
    0.47


    USSR (TSS - EUROVISION RECORDING)


    7.
    SV INTERIOR Cosmonaut on board aircraft surrounded by medical team.
    0.57

    8.
    SV Arrival of aircraft and cosmonauts descending aircraft steps. (2 SHOTS)
    1.12

    9.
    GV Cosmonauts driven from airport.
    1.21

    10.
    GV & SV Cosmonauts welcomed back. (4 SHOTS)
    1.39




    Initials JT/JRS



    NOTE TO EDITORS: THIS STORY HAS PART COMMENTARY BY NBC REPORTER ROY NEAL, WHICH MAY BE USED IF REQUIRED.
    PART EUROVISION RECORDING

    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: On November 23, at Cape Canaveral in the United States, the space shuttle was being prepared for a November 28 launch to carry the European Space Lab into orbit. The ninth planned shuttle mission, scheduled to last for nine days, was supposed to take place in late September, but was postponed due to technical problems. The difficulty lay with the insulation around the rocket's hooster engines. When the Challenger space shuttle takes off under the command of the six man crew, including John Young the first European astronaut, will be responsible for launching the Space Lab, which cost nearly one billion dollars. In the Soviet Union, the two man Cosmonaut crew who had spent nearly five months in space, returned safely to Earth. The men - Vladimir Lyakhov and Alexander Aledandrov - were reported to be feeling fit and well at the Baikonur Cosmodrome after their record spell in space. The trouble plagued Soyuz T-9 landed 170 kilometres (100 miles) east of Dzhezkasgan, in the Soviet Asian republic of Kazakhstan. The record stay was not planned but caused by mechanical failures. State Soviet television announced that the men had been awarded respectively the Order of Lenin and the title of Hero of the soviet Union for their 150 days orbiting the Earth. Live pictures of the men being welcomed back were shown on Soviet television but there were no live pictures of the touch-down or of their craft. The longest stay in space of 211 days was set by the previous Salyut mission.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAD8FIPU3V4PY6PG61E5J0MI8AY
    Media URN:
    VLVAD8FIPU3V4PY6PG61E5J0MI8AY
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    24/11/1983
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:39:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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