• Short Summary

    Australian and Japanese businessmen sit down next week in the Japanese city of Kyoto -- former capital -- for a series of talks on which much of Australia's future economic growth could depend.

  • Description

    Australian and Japanese businessmen sit down next week in the Japanese city of Kyoto -- former capital -- for a series of talks on which much of Australia's future economic growth could depend.

    At the meeting of the Australia-Japan Business Cooperation Committee, being held over three days from April 5th in a Kyoto hotel, leading industrialists from both countries will do much on a private level to determine the extent of future trade between the two pacific nations.

    The Australian contingent will be headed by Sir Edward Warren, Chairman of the New South Wales Coal Mines Proprietors Association. Sir Edward is also chairman of the Cooperation Committee.

    Heading the Japanese industrialists will be Shigeo Nagano, the Board Chairman of Nippon Steel and President of the Japan Chamber of Commerce.

    Australia's export sales to Japan have steadily increased over the past of years to the point that Japan is well and truly Australia's best customer -- taking 30 per cent of the Australian national output.

    In the last full financial year (1970/71), trade with Japan was worth 1,187.6-million dollars (Australian) to Australia.

    A large percentage of this was in sales of iron ore. In this field, the Japanese steel industry recently requested cut-backs in deliveries and said they wanted to re-negotiate long-term contracts because of Japan's current economic recession.

    Observers in Tokyo believe that iron ore contracts could become the main issue at stake at the Kyoto meeting.

    However, minerals are only one -- though very important -- facet of Australia's growing trade with Japan.

    This small exhibition by Australian manufacturers in Tokyo this week (last week!) emphasised a growing market here for Australian consumer products. Among the fastest selling items, according to trade officials, are hair dryers, heaters and barbecues.

    Fifty per cent of Australian sales are still in primary products like wheat, meat and cheese. the shelves of tokyo supermarkets are well-stocked with Australian products, including wine.

    However, sales increases for Australia in these fields are limited by Japanese import quctas.

    On the other foot, Australia is Japan's third best market for her exports (after the United States and Europe). Japan last year 1970/71) sold products worth 573-million dollars (Aust.) to "down under" consumers.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAD6ZC6LCR8K1I311ZXCWTVXRF4
    Media URN:
    VLVAD6ZC6LCR8K1I311ZXCWTVXRF4
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    01/03/1972
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:10:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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