• Short Summary

    TORONTO OF NATIONAL IMPORTANCE AS A FINANCIAL AND COMMERCIAL CENTRE AND SECOND ONLY TO MONTREAL IN MANUFACTURING OUTPUT, TORONTO IS A LEADING CENTRE OF MEDICAL RESEARCH AND OF EDUCATIONAL, MUSICAL, ARTISTIC AND PUBLISHING ACTIVITIES.

  • Description

    TORONTO OF NATIONAL IMPORTANCE AS A FINANCIAL AND COMMERCIAL CENTRE AND SECOND ONLY TO MONTREAL IN MANUFACTURING OUTPUT, TORONTO IS A LEADING CENTRE OF MEDICAL RESEARCH AND OF EDUCATIONAL, MUSICAL, ARTISTIC AND PUBLISHING ACTIVITIES. TORONTO IS CANADA'S SECOND LARGEST CITY WITH A POPULATION OF 2,145,637. FORMERLY A PREDOMINANTLY ANGLO-SAXON CITY, POST-WAR IMMIGRANTS HAVE GIVEN IT A COSMOPOLITAN ATMOSPHERE
    In the beginning Toronto was a fort. In 1834 with a population of 9,000 it was incorporated as the City of Toronto. In 1860 it became the capital of Upper Canada and today it is the capital city of the Province of Ontario. Although a seat of government for many years, in many respects Toronto remained a small town. All this has changed.

    The new Toronto didn't emerge until the late 1950's when it began burying the old image once and for all. Coffee houses ousted ice-cream parlours, experimental theatre replaced church theatre guilds, liquor licenses produced most civilized restaurants. The final touch in 1965 was the opening of the new City Hall -- the curvaceous symbol of Toronto in renaissance. The Finnish architect, Viljo Revell died before the City Hall was completed. Some say the building ranks with the wonders of the 20th Century. To those who described the building as unique, unusual, daring and bold, it typifies the spirit of the new Toronto.

    Metropolitan Toronto sprawls over an area of 250 square miles. Toronto proper has a living-in population of approximately 700,000 and copes very successfully with over a million more people a day. Every working day of the year commuters descend on the city via automobile, subway, streetcar, bus or trolley coach. The subway (Toronto's pride and joy) handles 30,000 people an hour. Thousands of citizens live and work at least 100' above ground -- perhaps one of the reasons the white collar worker carries coffee from subway dispensers to high places.

    Toronto International Airport handles more traffic than any other in Canada. Ontario's Macdonald-Cartier Freeway (or 401 as it is more familiarly known) is 510 miles of expressway, ending at the Quebec border where it joins the Trans Canada. Over the city of Toronto, the expressway balloons out to a width of 12 lanes and from the air resembles a plate of spaghetti. More than 3 million people in Ontario live and work within 10 miles of the 401. The Port of Toronto ranks 7th in Canada in tonnages handled. Her highly automated hump yards repair over 7,000 freight cars a week. Toronto's stock exchange is the 3rd biggest in North America and handles 70% of all trading in Canada. It is the 3rd biggest pool of radio and TV talent in North America.....its jazz scene is considered 3rd only to New York and San Francisco....the city is theatre-happy.

    All old structures are not removed... Casa Loma (1914) "the castle on the hill" was the dream of millionaire Sir Henry Pallatt. It incorporates features from castles all over Europe; has 98 rooms; took 3 years to build and cost $3 million. It has become a tourist attraction.

    The square at City Hall this summer was the scene of an exhibition of sculpture. The City Hall's permanent piece is the "Archer" by Henry Moore.

    Once, old-run-down-Yorkville, has now become Toronto's now stylish and swinging Village. Gaily coloured coffee houses an sidewalk cafes; the advent of jazz bands and folk singers and go-go dancers, have made the village a home away from home (for the young, i.e.) Permanent residents found that living in an area which jumped all night was a bit much and were forced to find living accommodation elsewhere. The younger set have taken over.

    Canada's largest annual fair, the Canadian National Exhibition, is held in Toronto in mid-August for 15 days, and is an exhibition of good old fashioned fun. Its 54 permanent buildings house displays and exhibits from all walks of Canadian life. This year it celebrates its 89th anniversary.

    Construction and renovation crews are hard at it. Toronto is becoming a city of sky-scrapers -- high rise apartment buildings, bank buildings, office buildings. Toronto's face is changing every day and you've got to be one of the 700,000 to keep up with it.

    Toronto "Boom Town" is here to stay and people from all over the globe have made it one of the great cities of the world.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAD3PMTSBBJS43J8QD0PMQSF98
    Media URN:
    VLVAD3PMTSBBJS43J8QD0PMQSF98
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    01/01/1967
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:04:19:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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