• Short Summary

    About 200 young seminarians -- Protest, Roman Catholic and Jewish -- are staging what they call the "Theological Students' Vigil For Civil Rights" in Washington, D.

  • Description

    1.
    Three men watch traffic
    0.04

    2.
    Traffic moving past camera
    0.08

    3.
    Three men watching
    0.12

    4.
    Lincoln Memorial - car pulls up, man gets out and shakes hands with man on curb
    0.24

    5.
    Three men ascend steps of Memorial
    0.32

    6.
    Three men walk up to Statue of Lincoln
    0.40

    7.
    Three men look at statue
    0.43

    8.
    Head of Lincoln statue
    0.49

    9.
    Three men standing on sidewalk
    0.54

    10.
    Young man shakes hands with each of vigil keepers and joins them
    0.59

    11.
    Sign"Theology Students Civil Rights Vigil"
    1.02

    12.
    Vigil keepers
    1.13

    13.
    Three vigil keepers - students and statue
    1.50



    Initials



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: About 200 young seminarians -- Protest, Roman Catholic and Jewish -- are staging what they call the "Theological Students' Vigil For Civil Rights" in Washington, D.C., at the Lincoln Memorial keeping a 24-hour, seven-days a week vigil while the civil rights debate in the U.S. Senate goes into its eight week (as of Monday 27 April).

    The students serve in shifts of two to four hours each. Each shift has in it one Protestant, one Catholic and one Jew -- plus a fourth member to answer any questions visitors may ask, and to hand out pamphlets stating their views.

    The U.S. Park Service allows anyone into the Lincoln Memorial any time, but does not allow any kind of demonstration inside, no matter how peaceful. So the seminarians make their visits to the statue of Lincoln itself fairly briefs, and then remain outside on the sidewalk until a new group arrives to relieve them.

    The students come in to Washington from seminaries throughout the country, serve a day or two or longer, then return to their class-rooms to be replaced by others.

    The loneliest and the quietest time in the Lincoln Memorial is late at night. The traffic and the tourists have long since gone home, for the most part, the lights inside are turned low, and except for the guards and Lincoln, the seminarians are the only ones there.

    The seminarians purpose, they say -- "We hope to get our message across and to have an impact without sensationalism."

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVACZNGIN7BXQAF6FNERQHB3EF0
    Media URN:
    VLVACZNGIN7BXQAF6FNERQHB3EF0
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    28/04/1964
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:01:51:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment