• Short Summary

    Mozambique, taken over by a revolutionary Marxist black government last year from a white-dominated colonial regime, is ideologically and racially opposed to its white-ruled neighbours -- Rhodesia and South Africa.

  • Description

    1.
    GVs AND SV Cabora Bassa dam, Mozambique. (3 shots)
    0.19

    2.
    SVs Power lines leading from Cabora Bassa and Frelimo soldiers on guard. (2 shots)
    0.37

    3.
    GV Railway carriages at Recano Garcia rail junction.
    0.40

    4.
    SV Mozambiquans passing through town on way to South African gold mines.
    0.48

    5.
    CU 'Wenela' recruiting company symbol.
    0.51

    6.
    SV Mining supervisor standing at doorway.
    0.54

    7.
    SVs Miners waiting at border town. (4 shots)
    1.10

    8.
    CU AND SV Miners giving fingerprints at recruiting office. (4 shots)
    1.31

    9.
    SV Train leaving station for South Africa.
    1.42

    10.
    SVs AND GVs Crane working at Maputo docks emptying coal into waiting barges. (6 shots)
    2.08

    11.
    GV Ships at quayside.
    2.13

    12.
    SVs AND CU Chrome ore in skips being loaded into ships. (4 shots)
    2.40

    13.
    CUs Rail trucks marked "RR" (Rhodesian Railways). (2 shots)
    2.48

    14.
    GV PAN ACROSS Harbour
    3.04


    TRANSCRIPT: REPORTER: "The symbol of colonial domination before independence was the Cabora Bassa Dam, built to perpetuate Portuguese rule. Then, Frelimo pledged to destroy it. Now, it wants to complete the dam to sell electricity to the dam's major customer -- South Africa. The Cabora Bassa powerlines have come under attack by the Rhodesian army, and are now guarded by Frelimo soldiers. Revolutionary Mozambique's relations with its white-ruled neighbours are a mixture of blood and irony.



    "Thousands of Mozambiquans every week pass through the town of Recano Garcia on the border with South Africa. They're off to work in the South African gold mines. Wenela is the South African company which recruits the miners in Mozambique.



    This legacy of colonialism earns Mozambique almost all its gold and dollars. The miners work on annual contracts, but in South Africa they only receive 40 per cent of their wages. The rest is sent back to Mozambique. Before independence, 120,000 Mozambiquans went to work in the gold mines. Now, the numbers are down to 80,000, but Frelimo can't afford to end the arrangement.



    "Few people in Mozambique are anxious to discuss economic relations with South Africa in public. Under the Portuguese, Mozambique was developed as an entrepot port for South Africa. The main customer at Maputo docks is still South Africa. Its own ports are so busy that South African businessmen have been forced to go on using Mozambique. It's still cheaper for them to send coal to Cape Town by ship from Maputo than by rail across South Africa.



    "South Africans now run the docks, in place of the Portuguese who have left. Mozambique claims that all its economic ties with Rhodesia have been completely cut off. But in the docks, we found a curious thing -- chrome, that purportedly came from South Africa, was being loaded for shipping. Mozambique reluctantly admits its trade links with South Africa -- but chrome is Rhodesia's most important export, and it has no distinguishing marks of origin. The chrome we filmed had been sent from South Africa in trucks marked 'RR' -- Rhodesian Railways.



    They were manufactured in Bulawayo, Rhodesia. The trucks could have been left stranded in Mozambique last year, when the border with Rhodesia was closed, but no-one in the docks would confirm this. Nor would any Frelimo official give a direct answer to the question: 'When will revolutionary Mozambique end its economic ties with South Africa?'"




    Initials VS 22.45



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Mozambique, taken over by a revolutionary Marxist black government last year from a white-dominated colonial regime, is ideologically and racially opposed to its white-ruled neighbours -- Rhodesia and South Africa. But in order to survive, the Mozambiquan government is being forced to continue the old economic links with South Africa -- for in its colonial era the nation was strongly linked to its bigger and stronger neighbour. The old ties are proving difficult, if not impossible, to sever. There is some evidence, too, that the principal port of Maputo is being used to export Rhodesian chrome -- the most important export of all for Mr. Ian Smith's regime. A British film crew went into Mozambique to find out just how many trading links still exist between the widely-diverse nations, and came back with this report.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVACUUQERR5XUINR2Q86S8EHKVY7
    Media URN:
    VLVACUUQERR5XUINR2Q86S8EHKVY7
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    10/05/1977
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:03:05:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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