• Short Summary

    Newspapers of the western world August 10 headlined a 4,000-word indictment by the Soviet News Agency Tass claiming that Francis Gary Powers - 31-year-old pilot of the American U-2 plane shot down in Russia May 1 - had "acknowledged his guilt." It stated that Powers, who faces trial for espionage by Moscow military court August 17, admitted that he flew over Soviet territory and photographed points marked on his map.

  • Description

    A.
    British newspaper headlines relating to Powers and CU..Powers three shots..showing the U-2 at an American air base.
    0.40

    B.
    Moscow. Khrushchev enters Supreme Soviet and waves pictures believed to be taken by Powers.
    1.20

    C.
    Moscow. People entering U-2 spy plane exhibition PANNING shot showing remains of plane also CU's...of Powers in flying suit and CU...U-2 PAN shot over documents and slogan for help in every language PAN over revolver, rings, watches and aerial photographs believed to be taken by Powers. Khrushchev attending exhibition, points to bullet holes in plane. Man recording his views in open book. More equipment and plane.
    2.36

    D.
    New York. U.N. meeting. CU..Cabot Lodge. CU. Gromyko.
    2.52

    E.
    SOF...USA. Mrs. Powers is interviewed by members of the press. Question "Did you know where your husband was going?" Answer. Mrs. Powers replies.....she goes on..."In view of Mr. Khrushchev's actions in the past in re-uniting separated families, I have hoped that Joe will be returned." "At the present, as I said before, I have every confidence with the State Department, and our Government can certainly conduct negotiations better than any appeal made by me."
    3.40

    F.
    London. Arrival of Mr. & Mrs. Powers (SOF) Question "What good do you think it will do going to Moscow?" Answer "I think it will do something." Question "How do you feel about going to Russia?" "If I didn't have to go, I wouldn't." Question. "Do you hope to see Mr. Khrushchev?" Answer "I will see him before I come back." Question "Have you made any arrangements to see him?" Answer "I have asked to see him." Question "And have you got any reply?" Answer "He said he'd help me." CU. Question "Will you be present at the trial?" Answer "I couldn't tell you what he said, yes, I'll be present at the trial gentlemen I'll have to go." Mr. Powers rises and leaves.
    4.40

    G.
    GV.INT. (Moscow) Hall of Columns House in the Central of Trade Unions during past trials (2 shots).
    4.52



    Initials PC/O/V/AW/CW



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Newspapers of the western world August 10 headlined a 4,000-word indictment by the Soviet News Agency Tass claiming that Francis Gary Powers - 31-year-old pilot of the American U-2 plane shot down in Russia May 1 - had "acknowledged his guilt." It stated that Powers, who faces trial for espionage by Moscow military court August 17, admitted that he flew over Soviet territory and photographed points marked on his map.

    The American N.A.S.A. - National Aeronautics and Space Administration - U-2 aircraft was a weather research plane, and following the incident the United States Government immediately grounded all aircraft of the same type for an "equipment check."
    Premier Nikita Khrushchev broke the news to the Supreme Soviet of the U.S.S.R. May 5 when he dramatically announced that an American military aircraft had been brought down by a rocket at Sverdlovsk - 1,200 miles inside Russian territory. At the end of the three-day session he waved - to tumultuous applause - photographs of Soviet airfields said to have been taken by the airman.

    The wreckage of the U-2 aircraft and equipment said to belong to Powers, were put on exhibition in Moscow's Gorky Park. On a surprise visit May 11 Mr. Khrushchev observed the silent pistol, dagger, camera and other "evidence" and said he would not like to be in President Eisenhower's shoes when he visited Moscow the following month. "People will have a lot of questions to ask, and they will be right too", he said.

    At a debate on the spy-plane incident in New York May 23, Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko told the United Nations Security Council that the flight was an aggressive act "unheard of in peace time." He spoke of "shattering consequences" that might follow if the U.N. did nothing to halt such flights. Chief United States delegate, Henry Cabot Lodge, referred to Russian double standards in maintaining thousands of spies while protesting at one "harmless flight."
    Later, the American President's Russian visit was cancelled when, after threatening to leave the Paris Summit talks unless President Eisenhower condemned the United States Air Force's "provocative action" against the U.S.S.R, Mr. Khrushchev left Paris - and a collapsed Summit - May 20.

    Mrs. Barbara Powers - wife of the shot-down airman - told reporters in Georgia, U.S.A. May 10 (SOF) that her husband was not a spy, and that she hopes and prays for his return. She said she did not know what type of work her husband did for the International Security and Space Agency and put her faith in Mr. Khrushchev's actions in the past in reuniting separate families.

    On August 11, the mother and father of Francis Powers arrived in London on their way to Moscow for their son's trial. Mrs. Powers - who has a bad heart condition - was accompanied by her doctor. In an interview at the airport Mr. Oliver Powers, obviously very disturbed, was non-committal in his replies to reporters. Asked (SOF) if he thought his son had been brainwashed he said "not until I have seen him." Francis Powers's wife Barbara was to fly direct to Moscow from U.S.A. Aug 12.

    Francis Gary Powers will be tried in Moscow's historic Central House of Trade Unions. There, in the building's hall of Columns, he will face the Collegium of the Supreme Soviet led by famous Russian prosecutor, Roman Andreyevich Rudenko. Powers will be defended by an attorney identified only as Griniv - a member of the "Moscow City Lawyers Collegium." Espionage ranks as a "particularly dangerous" crime in the U.S.S.R., and is punishable by death or from 7 to 15 years imprisonment.

    Another Moscow trial which shook the world took place in 1933. Among others, six British nationals were accused of espionage and were said to have led a group of counter-revolutionaries to wreck machinery throughout Russia. After a long case - with Andrei Vishinski presiding as chief prosecutor - two received prison sentences of 2 and 3 years, three were deported and one was acquitted.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVACRDKHOEROZN3M4QY1CZ8ILV5O
    Media URN:
    VLVACRDKHOEROZN3M4QY1CZ8ILV5O
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    12/08/1960
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:01:36:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment