• Short Summary

    Ten thousand Boy Scouts from 51 different countries set up camp July 17 at Manila, Philippines, for ten days of "jungle living" during the tenth world jamboree.

  • Description

    1.
    MS. Entrance to jamboree site.
    0.05

    2.
    MS. Filipino scouts greeting with dance.
    0.20

    3.
    CU. Thai and Laotian scouts.
    0.25

    4.
    MS. Filipino scouts with Japanese scouts.
    0.37

    5.
    CU. Legs.
    0.42

    6.
    LS. Crowd at mess hall.
    0.46

    7.
    LS. Ditto.
    0.51

    8.
    MS. Swedish and other Scandinavians out hamboo for huts..
    0.54

    9.
    MLS. Philippines putting the roof.
    0.58

    10.
    LS. Hut interior.
    1.02

    11.
    CU. Canadian scouts.
    1.06

    12.
    LS. More scouts.
    1.09

    13.
    MS. Ditto.
    1.13

    14.
    CU. Canadian cleans muddy botts.
    1.17

    15.
    CU. Muddy boots.
    1.21

    16.
    MS. Canadian signs autographs.
    1.26

    17.
    MS. British scouts examine palm leaves.
    1.30

    18.
    MS. Canadian scouts look at Chinese junk models.
    1.34

    19.
    LS. Camp site.
    1.38



    Initials ANH/JH/CW



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Ten thousand Boy Scouts from 51 different countries set up camp July 17 at Manila, Philippines, for ten days of "jungle living" during the tenth world jamboree. The welcome to 3,000 foreign scouts was given by 8,000 Philippine scouts with a native war dance in traditional costumes.

    The jamboree, first to be held in Asia in 40 years of scouting, was situated in Hectare Mountain City - carved out of the hills and woods of Mount Mailing. The jamboree town had all modern facilities; piped water, electricity, telephones, radio station, hospital, market, indoor theater, mess hells, swimming pools and plumbing. But the scouts, true to their motto, were ready for jungle living and under the instruction of Philippine members, built huts from tropical bamboos and palm leaves.

    Rain marred the first day, but boot cleaning and other chores filled the time. Autograph hunting was a popular pastime and native crafts, especially the model of a Chinese junk caught the fancy of many scouts.

    Largest contingent came from Formosa numbering 700. From Canada there were ninety and the smallest, Israel, sent one. During the jamboree foreign scouts visited Philippine homes and learned to adjust themselves to heat, humidity and native food.

    The jamboree ended July 26 with a parade in which the British contingent took part. The last jamboree was held in Britain in 1957.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVACQ9D5WGV6JELXAWATG7UHIAVS
    Media URN:
    VLVACQ9D5WGV6JELXAWATG7UHIAVS
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    27/07/1959
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    MP4
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:01:39:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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