• Short Summary

    Canadians learn at an early age to enjoy the snowy winter months and Christmas brings a particular joy to their hearts, when the colourful decorations, some modest and others lavish, are put up usually several weeks in advance of the day and are left up until January 6th, (Epiphany, Twelfth-night, or commonly called Little Christmas), to lend a fairyland look to the country.

  • Description

    Canadians learn at an early age to enjoy the snowy winter months and Christmas brings a particular joy to their hearts, when the colourful decorations, some modest and others lavish, are put up usually several weeks in advance of the day and are left up until January 6th, (Epiphany, Twelfth-night, or commonly called Little Christmas), to lend a fairyland look to the country.

    In the olden days, many Canadians drove out to the country to cut their own trees. Now with large urban and suburban areas, the Christmas tree growers do a thriving business and export of evergreen (Spruce, pine or fir) to the United States and even to Bermuda, Trinidad and Puerto Rico, is increasing every year despite the popularity of artificial trees.

    In Edmonton, Alberta (where the buying sequence of our story was shot), the Y.M.C.A. Men's Club and their wives set in a temporary man-made forest in a vacant lot. In October, before the frost sets in, they dig holes in the ground and put pieces of pipe in the holes so that they can stand the trees up in an attractive fashion. As the season approaches, spotlights are placed on poles to give the trees a fairylike appearance. Also, a nativity scene with live animals -- donkeys and geese, among others -- has now become a part of the display and, or course, the animals are great favourites with the city children. These Y.M.C.A. workers do all the work voluntarily and the profit is used to send under-privileged youngsters to camp in the summer months.

    Well bundled up against the cold weather, the children with their parents drive out to the lot to choose the tree of trees they want. It's great fun for the children to prowl through the tree lots -- this sequence was shot in 15 degree below zero (Fahrenheit) weather -- the volunteers used a cut down empty oil drum as a stove, to warm their hands.

    With snow a reality in most part of Canada in December, Canadians love to decorate the outside of their homes (as well as inside) for the festive season -- some modestly and some lavishly as shown in our footage shot in Montreal, the Town of Mount Royal (the town-hall and the hanging baskets from lamp standards) and surrounding communities of the island of Montreal. Many people go for walks or drives -- some even on ski-doos as caught on film by our cameramen -- to see the decorated lawns and homes. Last Christmas, our cameramen filmed a real helicopter parked on a lawn with a Santa Clause supposedly getting out of it, an elaborate display of fountains with coloured lights trained on them shooting water into the air -- despite the freezing weather (this was accomplished by the owner placing large quantities of salt in the water in his swimming pool) -- and many of the decorated homes along the suburban street. Also, a sequence on a family decorating their home and the children coming down on Christmas morning to see the presents under their Christmas tree.

    Of course, Canadian children usually receive skates and skiis for Christmas. We filmed them trying them out on the ski slopes and the skating rink at Mount Royal -- in the centre of Montreal, which is a popular place with Montrealers during the winter months, as well as in the other seasons.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVACNGPPTIA6VCIKAIQXZGVDKPVP
    Media URN:
    VLVACNGPPTIA6VCIKAIQXZGVDKPVP
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    21/12/1964
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:05:46:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

Comments (0)

We always welcome comments and more information about our films.
All posts are reactively checked. Libellous and abusive comments are forbidden.

Add your comment