• Short Summary

    Four thousand U.S. Marines went ashore Friday (28 January) at a beach 35 miles south?

  • Description

    1.
    Aerial shot, troops carrier
    0.06

    2.
    U.S. flag on mast
    0.11

    3.
    Marines sharpening bayonets
    0.14

    4.
    Marine writing letter
    0.16

    5.
    Marine playing harmonica
    0.19

    6.
    Mirror showing aircraft carrier
    0.21

    7.
    2 shots, Marines repairing helicopters
    0.27

    8.
    Deck officer directing helicopters
    0.29

    9.
    Helicopter taking off
    0.32

    10.
    3 shots, Marines boarding landing craft
    0.40

    11.
    Naval officer
    0.42

    12.
    3 shots, Marines in landing craft
    0.50

    13.
    3 shots, Marines landing
    1.07

    14.
    Aerial shots, beach
    1.10

    15.
    Tractor
    1.23

    16.
    2 shots, Marines move in land
    1.36



    Initials



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Four thousand U.S. Marines went ashore Friday (28 January) at a beach 35 miles south of the Marine base at Chu Lai in South Vietnam. It was the largest amphibious landing of the Vietnamese war and the biggest since the Inchon landings in Korea.

    The landings had been kept confidential for security reasons until Monday. It was reported that the Marines would probably attempt to link up with First Cavalry troops operating to the south in the northern part of Binhdinh province around Anthai.

    The Marines were brought to the beaches by eighteen ships of the U.S. Seventh Fleet, including the cruiser Oklahoma City, which is armed with guided missiles. They had come from Oregon in the United States during the summer and had been rehearsing for operations in Vietnam at a base in Okinawa. Sixteen hundred of them waited for the assault aboard the USS Valley Forge, a World War II aircraft carrier converted to a helicopter carrier.

    In the traditional landing barges and in helicopters, the Marines stormed ashore. There was a heavy sea running but it apparently caused few problems. The Marines encountered light sniper fire on the beaches and some were wounded. Marine casualties were officially described as light. They killed one Viet Cong and captured 12 suspects; by the end of the first day, the beachhead was secured and the Marines were preparing to move forward.

    The landing is officially know as Operation Double Eagle. The First Cavalry operation to the south is known as Operation Masher.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVACLCGBPOSTNF8XZXW5F60J7DA7
    Media URN:
    VLVACLCGBPOSTNF8XZXW5F60J7DA7
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    31/01/1966
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:01:37:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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