• Short Summary

    Despite defeat and worryingly high coasts Africans found a lot to cheer them in their two day match with the United State which ended in Daker, Senegal last Sunday. (August 5)
    The African men's team finished only ten points behind the Americans.

  • Description

    Despite defeat and worryingly high coasts Africans found a lot to cheer them in their two day match with the United State which ended in Daker, Senegal last Sunday. (August 5)
    The African men's team finished only ten points behind the Americans. Runners like Jipcho Bayi and Asati proved superior in the middle and distance races and the United States had to rely on sprinter Steve Williams and their immense strength in the field events.

    Jean Claude Ganga, secretary general of Africa's Supreme Council for Sport, said before the meeting that the 40,000 dollars (GBP 16,000) cost was so high for African sport that it might be the last fixture of its kind unless a better contract could be arranged. Afterwards Mr. Ganga declared himself well satisfied and said African athletes had proved they were still fast on the way up.

    SYNOPSIS: Senegal's President Senghor opened last week's Africa versus United States athletics match which despite defeat Africans saw as proof that the continent's athletes are getting still stronger.

    The African men's team finished only ten points behind the United States and runners like Jipcho and Asati showed the Americans their heels in the middle and distance races.

    As expected it was left to the American's sprinters and field event men to change the scoreline - but the United States' women's team were not stretched. Jackie Thompson led from starting blocks to tape and the American women went on to score twice as many points as the Africans in their win. Steve Williams underlined the Americans all round sprinting strength.

    Williams won the two hundred metres as well.

    The United states team must have been relieved by Williams' success because two of their best black sprinters, Herb Washington and Marshall Dill went home after accusing American officials of discrimination. American head coach Jim Bush denied the accusation. He said the pair asked to go home and officials got them out as quick as they could.

    America's Lanier took the long jump with a leap of over eight metres but Kenya's Ben Jipcho showed why he is the world record holder in the three thousand metre steeplechase. Jean Claude Ganga, secretary general of Africa's Supreme Council for Sport, said before the meeting that the forty thousand dollars cost was so high it might be the last fixture of its kind unless a better contract could be arranged. Afterwards Mr. Ganga declared himself well satisfied - Jipcho here finished a street ahead.

    The United States hammered the Africans in their first match two years ago. Africa have since their greatest athletes Kenyan Kipchoge Keino to the American professional ranks but their new champions made a grand fight of it. The quarter mile proved particularly painful to the Americans. Would record holder John Aki Bua won the hurdles race at that distance; an all Kenyan team won the four hundred metre relay and here Charles Asati wins the individual race.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVACHLDV0VPEKD0WW7IZ09YCXSVZ
    Media URN:
    VLVACHLDV0VPEKD0WW7IZ09YCXSVZ
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    01/01/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:57:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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