• Short Summary

    South African government officials have begun the first phase of a rehousing programme involving an estimated 30,000 black squatters from Cape Town's 'Crossroads' shanty settlement.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Residents of Crossroads shanty town in Cape Town pulling down slum buildings. (2 SHOTS)
    0.21

    2.
    SVs Trucks being loaded with residents' belongings.
    0.37

    3.
    SV & GV Residents leaving shanty town in trucks and waving goodbye to friends. (3 SHOTS)
    1.02

    4.
    SVs Belongings loaded on to another truck and residents leaving village. (2 SHOTS)
    1.25

    5.
    SV Tracking shot along newly erected town of Crossroads as residents arrive (2 SHOTS)
    1.50

    6.
    GV Construction work and PAN TO newly built houses. (2 SHOTS)
    2.08




    Initials JS





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: South African government officials have begun the first phase of a rehousing programme involving an estimated 30,000 black squatters from Cape Town's 'Crossroads' shanty settlement. On Wednesday (26 November eight families left their shacks and moved into newly-built homes on the 'New Crossroads' township three miles (5 km) away.

    SYNOPSIS: The scheme will be implemented over a period of several years with up to ten families being moved each day. As the 'Crossroads' residents leave, their homes are bulldozed to prevent other squatters taking over.

    In 1977 and 1978 the Banty Administration Board served demolition orders on three camps in Cape Town and sanctioned police raids to evict squatters from 'Crossroads'. Local and international organisation s campaigned for a reprieve for the community and for the repeal of the Influx Control regulations which limit black migration to urban areas. Many of those living in the illegal settlements had travelled from the Transkei and Ciskei to join husbands and fathers with legal work permits. In April last year Minister of Plural Relations and Development, Dr. Piet Koornhof, announced that Crossroads residents would be served with temporary permits to stay in Cape Town, and provided with new housing. But he said only those who had lived in would qualify fro rehousing; later arrivals would be sent back to their homelands.

    So far 106 houses have all been built in the new township, and 1700 more are scheduled for completion by the end of next year. Crossroads residents pay a small monthly service charge but the new houses will be let on a tenancy basis. Rents will be linked to income but the minimum charge is more than twice the current facilities payment. The authorities say families may have to share accommodation during the early stages of the building project, but each family unit will eventually have its own home.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVACGRIXL6NP4E6DIAMD743DY8JZ
    Media URN:
    VLVACGRIXL6NP4E6DIAMD743DY8JZ
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    28/11/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:07:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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