• Short Summary

    MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

    Medical and legal experts have been struggling with the implications of the death last year of a couple who left behind them two frozen embryos.

  • Description

    1. CU PULL BACK TO SV Surgeon holding crying baby. 0.05
    2. SVs & CU Lab technician working with vat of frozen embryos. (4 SHOTS) 0.21
    3. SCU Lab technician looks into microscope. 0.25
    4. CU Lawyer Russell Scott speaks. (SOT) 0.44
    5. SV ZOOM INTO CU Technician lifts frozen test tube out of vat. 0.50
    6. GV Sign outside Queen Victoria Medical Centre. 0.54
    7. GV & CU Gynaecologist Robert Jansen speaks. (SOT) (2 SHOTS) 1.01
    8. CU Mary Pretty, "Right to Life" spokeswoman speaks. (SOT) 1.06
    9. CUs Lab technician at work with frozen embryos. (3 SHOTS) 1.15
    TRANSCRIPTS:
    SCOTT: (SEQ 4) "The embryo could be thawed as we believe technology permits and probably given to another woman, in which case, under the recently enacted law of Victoria, the woman who gave birth to the donated embryo child would be regarded as the child's mother."
    JANSEN: (SEQ 7) "The institution has only one option, and that is to destroy the embryo."
    PRETTY: (SEQ 8) "These two embryos need a guardian in order to ensure that their interests are protected."
    InitialsCC/JS

    NOTE TO EDITORS: THIS STORY HAS COMMENTARY BY CHANNEL 7 REPORTER ANDREW FOWLER, WHICH MAY BE USED IF REQUIRED.
    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

    Medical and legal experts have been struggling with the implications of the death last year of a couple who left behind them two frozen embryos. Mario and Elisa Rios, both US citizens, died in an air crash in Chile, leaving in their separate wills a million-dollar estate. In 1981, they tried unsuccessfully to have a test-tube baby, but when the operation - in Victoria Medical Centre, Australia - failed, two frozen fertilised eggs remained to give them a second chance later on. The doctors learned only this year that the Rios couple had died, creating, they believe, the world's first test-tube orphans. New South Wales lawyer Russell Scott said on June 18 that an embryo could be implanted in another woman, but would then by law become the heir of that woman. However, Sydney gynaecologist Robert Jansen declared the Medical Centre had no choice but to destroy the embryos. Any such decision would, however, be fought all the way by "Right to Life" groups. Mary Pretty, speaking for the Sydney "Right to Life" association, suggested a guardian be appointed for them. Observers believe the main issue at stake is when life is considered to begin - at conception, or at birth.

    Source: CHANNEL 7 NETWORK AUSTRALIA

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVACEGWO9ERA50FCNSNNW63OFAD5
    Media URN:
    VLVACEGWO9ERA50FCNSNNW63OFAD5
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    19/06/1984
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:16:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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