• Short Summary

    Mass air transportation will be possible for the first time with Douglas Aircraft Company's three new and greatly advanced models of the famed DC-8 Jetliner.

  • Description

    Mass air transportation will be possible for the first time with Douglas Aircraft Company's three new and greatly advanced models of the famed DC-8 Jetliner.

    The company announced today that two of the new Series 60 models are in production at the Douglas Aircraft Division, Long Beach, Calif., and the third is under development.

    Increased in size, capacity and efficiency, this new breed of the Douglas DC-8 was developed to meet airline needs created by a world-wide air transportation boom.

    Model 61, first in the new series, will be more than 33 feet longer than the current Series 50 DC-8.The new aircraft will be 184 feet long, making it the world's largest jetliner, and will carry 251 passengers in an all-coach configuration, 62 more than any previous DC-8.

    The Model 61 will reduce direct operating costs to less than one cent per seat-mile for the first time in aviation history.

    First of the giant airlines will roll off the assembly line in January 1966, with the first flight scheduled for two months later.

    Second of the new Series 60 DC-8s is the Model 62, an ultra-long range transport, with 6-foot longer wing span and an almost 7-foot longer fuselage than largest DC-8 now in service.

    Scandinavian Airlines Systems has ordered four of the Model 62s for non-stop flights over its polar route between Copenhagen and the west coast of the Unites States.Maximum range of Model 62 with full payload is 5750 miles.First flight of the Model 62 is scheduled for July 1966.

    Under development is the third of the advanced airliners, the Model 63, which will combine the 33-foot fuselage extension of the Model 61 and the aerodynamic and power plant improvements of the Model 62.

    Series 50 DC-8 and the DC-8F combination passenger-cargo transport are the newest of the DC-8s now in service.Twenty-eight airlines operate DC-8s throughout the world.

    Baggage and cargo space under the floor are proportionately increased to 2360 cubic feet, enabling an airline operator to pay the entire direct operating cost of the aircraft from cargo capacity.Model 61 DC-8 reduces direct operating costs to less than one cent per seat-mile for the first time in aviation history.

    The increased cubic capacity of the freighter version of Model 61 makes it possible for air cargo operators to accept many new categories of lighter density items for shipment.

    Both the passenger and cargo model have maximum take-off weights of 325,000 pounds, landing weights of 240,000 pounds and zero fuel weights of 224,000 pounds.

    The first Model 61 DC-8 will roll off the assembly line in January 1966, with the first flight scheduled for two months later.

    Mode 62 DC-8, an ultra-long range transport, will have a wing span increase of six feet for a new total of 148.4 feet, as well as an extension of 80 inches to the fuselage, bringing the length to 157.4 feet.The three-foot wing tip extensions significantly reduce induced drag under cruise conditions and also facilitate additional fuel tankage.

    The extension of the Model 62 fuselage, by means of additional 40-inch cabin sections fore and aft of the wing, increases seating capacity to 189 in all-coach configuration.Engine pods of new design augment thrust and reduce drag by ducting turbofan air through the entire length of the nacelle.Redesigned pylons for the ducted fan engines reduce interference drag to a minimum.

    Model 62 is capable of carrying full payloads of 40,000 pounds non-stop and against prevailing headwinds from central European points to the west coast of the United States with ample fuel reserves.Maximum range with full payload is 5750 miles.

    The passenger version has a maximum take-off weight of 335,000 pounds, landing weight of 240,000 pounds and zero fuel weight of 195,000 pounds.It will be offered in a cargo version also.

    First flight of Model 62 is scheduled for July 1966, following roll out in May.

    Scandinavian Airlines System has ordered four of the Model 62 DC-8s for delivery starting early in 1967.The long range models will be used on the carrier's polar route between Copenhagen and the U.S.Pacific Coast.

    A third Series 60 DC-8 under development, designated the Model 63, will combine the full 400-inch fuselage extension of the Model 61 for greater payload capacity and the aerodynamic Had power plant improvements of the long range Model 62.

    Aerodynamic refinements in the Model 62 DC-8 increase fuel mileage efficiency by approximately 10 per cent.Combining this in the Model 63 with the enlarged cabin and fuel capacity will result in an earning potential nearly double that of any current large passenger or cargo-carrying jet transport.

    "The Series 60 DC-8s will make true mass air transportation possible for the first time," McGowen predicted."These models are designed to meet the requirements for airline growth on transcontinental, intercontinental or very long range operations, such as the polar and trans-Pacific routes between continents."
    LONG BEACH, Calif., April 4 -- Three new and greatly advanced versions of the DC-8 Jetliner were announced at Douglas Aircraft Group headquarters here today by Jackson R.McGowen, Group vice president-Aircraft of the Douglas Aircraft Company.Two of the new Series 60 models are in production, and a third is under development.

    Increased in size, capacity and efficiency, this new breed of the famed Douglas DC-8 will far outperform the preceding models which now hold world commercial jet transport records for speed, altitude, distance and payload-carrying capability.

    "With these vastly improved models, Douglas is first to respond to new airline needs created by a world-wide air transportation boom," McGowen said.

    Mode 61, first in the new series, will be more than 33 feet longer than the highly successful current Series 50 DC-8 and DC-8F Jet Trader.Its total length of 184 feet will make it the world's largest jetliner.

    The fuselage of the Model 61 is extended 400 inches by the addition of cabin sections of 200 inches each fore and aft of the wing.This extension, together with a rearrangement of lavatories and galley areas to provide more efficient seating, will permit the Model 61 DC-9 to accommodate 251 passengers in an all-coach configuration, 62 more than any previous DC-8.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAC37MTASKBUFZSXPUOEWRD3Z0H
    Media URN:
    VLVAC37MTASKBUFZSXPUOEWRD3Z0H
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    05/04/1965
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:00:50:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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