• Short Summary

    One of the most revolutionary fighter aircraft of the jet age - the Folland Gnat - is now rolling off the production lines at the Folland works at Hamble, close to Southampton.

  • Description

    One of the most revolutionary fighter aircraft of the jet age - the Folland Gnat - is now rolling off the production lines at the Folland works at Hamble, close to Southampton.

    Already on order for the Finnish and Indian Air Forces, the Gnat is now in the course of being developed into a two setter trainer-to be in service with the Royal Air Force by 1959 - and a level-flight supersonic fighter.

    The first Gnat for the Indian Air force has now been completed and work is going ahead to complete the order of 25 of these fighters for the Indians and a further 12 for the Finnish Air Force. In addition to these orders, an Indian aircraft company is to build the Gnat under licence while the Finns have an option to produce further aircraft under the same conditions.

    Fronted by three models of the Gnat - including the proposed two-seater version - Mr. Petter, who designed the world-famous Canberra bomber and has been with Folland's since 1950, is the starting point of a unique production line.

    Straight drawings of the many parts included in the aircraft are transferred onto metal by the Astrafcil process. These metal outlines are then sent on to produce templates which are used as patterns for the final parts to be used in the construction of the aircraft.

    Another unusual feature in the construction of this aircraft is the sub-section working. While one group of workers fill the cockpit and nose with radar and other apparatus, another group work on a revolving cylinder which enables them to reach every part of the short fuselage with ease. Further teams work on the tail units while the wings stand stacked and ready for final assembly.

    Completing the make-up, the Bristol jet engine used in these little aircraft is placed in position.

    Despite the size of this GBP100,000 aircraft, the Gnat is loved by all who have flown her. Carrying conventional armament and capable of taking off from short runways, the little fighter costs roughly one third of that of the P.l. or the Hawker Hunter - Britain's two first-line fighter aircraft of the moment.

    Now, with the RAF planning to buy the trainer version, the Gnat faces a new and even more successful future in the highly competitive aircraft industry.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAC25DNUU4UW2UAFSBVNLMAJZ7P
    Media URN:
    VLVAC25DNUU4UW2UAFSBVNLMAJZ7P
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    25/02/1958
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Black & White
    Duration:
    00:04:10:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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