• Short Summary

    Archaeologists in Portugal have uncovered a Roman villa dating back to the period when the Romans occupied the country from the second century BC until the fourth century.

  • Description

    1.
    SV PAN ZOOM IN Village and sign in Southern Portugal
    0.11

    2.
    GV PAN Horse and cart standing in front of diggings
    0.19

    3.
    SV People working on dig and sifting through earth (2 shots)
    0.27

    4.
    SV PULL OUT Skeleton ZOOM OUT TO People digging
    0.38

    5.
    SV People digging ZOOM OUT site
    0.48

    6.
    GV PAN Site
    1.01

    7.
    SV Archaeologist showing boy remains of pots
    1.07

    8.
    SV Skeleton ( 2 shots)
    1.153

    9.
    SV ZOOM IN Teeth
    1.18

    10.
    SV People digging
    1.28

    11.
    SV Broken pots
    1.30

    12.
    SV Roman bath
    1.36

    13.
    SCU Coins and broken pottery (2 shots)
    1.46

    14.
    GV PAN Site
    1.57




    Initials AM/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Archaeologists in Portugal have uncovered a Roman villa dating back to the period when the Romans occupied the country from the second century BC until the fourth century. Scientists say the ruins are unique because they are so big and in such good condition.

    SYNOPSIS: The town of Vidigueira, and important centre for Portugal's wine producers and home to an order of Saint Vincent friars for centuries.

    It was near here that a rich Roman land-owner built the villa when the Roman Empire was at its height.

    The remains of the villa were discovered more than ten years ago when art experts visiting the order recognised characteristically Roman architecture in the monastery. Part of the villa had been transformed into a religious house belonging to the friars.

    Work on the site has been underway for ten years now and it's expected to be another five before the research is completed.

    The archaeologists have uncovered baths, servants quarters, a bakery, grain stores and gardens. Most of it, they say, is in good condition and could prove to be one of the most important Roman finds in Europe.

    Some of the former residents were also unearthed. This dig ha been organised by the Lisbon-based Gulbenkian Foundation, the Portuguese Department of Culture and the French Centre National de Recherche Scientifique which is paying half the cost. The Romans first dominated this part of Portugal in the second century before Christ. In Roman times the area was a wheat belt and there were important mines not far away. Julius Ceasar governed the region for a time. Later, the Romans pushed further into central Portugal.

    Christianity reached Vidigueira in the third century and has stayed ever since-entwined with the remnants of the Romans.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAC15OUNJE02L1OENRNFVR6VCNG
    Media URN:
    VLVAC15OUNJE02L1OENRNFVR6VCNG
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    14/09/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:57:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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