• Short Summary

    Black nationalist leader Joshua Nkomo has said that Rhodesian security police had warned him that "a group of white people" were plotting his assassination.

  • Description

    1.
    MV: Rhodesian nationalist leader Joshua Nkomo surrounded by supporters in Highfields township, Salisbury, Rhodesia, on return from Geneva conference.
    0.08

    2.
    SV: black and white uniformed police standing by.
    0.10

    3.
    SV PAN: cheering, chanting, dancing supporters.
    0.21

    4.
    TGV PAN: massed crowds at Nkomo reception rally.
    0.27

    5.
    SV: Nkomo interviewed by reporter.
    1.18


    SMITH: "There's been a lot of support here in the last week for Bishop Muzorewa, do you think you have the kind of support that he has?"



    NKOMO: "Oh maybe they're the church people, I've got the political people of Zimbabwe, so that w have the support throughout the country (indistinct) throughout the country."



    SMITH: "Do you think then that you are the senior leader of the African population?"



    NKOMO: "I don't think. I'm not here to make myself (indistinct) I'm here to free the country and I went through tortures of all kinds for 23 years so that what matters to me, I'm competing with anybody, if you think I'm competing then you're making a mistake."




    Initials RH/AMN/PNG/0029



    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Black nationalist leader Joshua Nkomo has said that Rhodesian security police had warned him that "a group of white people" were plotting his assassination. He said he was warned of the assassination plot at the Geneva conference on Rhodesia, now adjourned until the 17th of January.

    SYNOPSIS: Mr. Nkomo made the claim in Salisbury on Sunday (19 December) when he returned home from Geneva. About 5,000 of his supporters were waiting to greet him in the black township of Highfields on the out skirts of the capital, not nearly as many as welcomed Bishop Muzorewa, Mr. Nkomo's chief rival, last week. But Mr. Nkomo, who joined Robert Mugabe in a "patriotic front" in Geneva, told reporter Ian Smith that he came home to free his country, not to compete with anyone.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVAC0ZSIRGTQ4DBQYJUB1F4ZY34T
    Media URN:
    VLVAC0ZSIRGTQ4DBQYJUB1F4ZY34T
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    20/12/1976
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:18:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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