• Short Summary

    INTRODUCTION By the half-way stage in the Silver Jubilee Safari rally in Kenya on Friday (8 April), most of the competitors of the original 68 starters were still going after two days and nights of the world's toughest rally.

  • Description

    INTRODUCTION By the half-way stage in the Silver Jubilee Safari rally in Kenya on Friday (8 April), most of the competitors of the original 68 starters were still going after two days and nights of the world's toughest rally.

    SYNOPSIS: Leading the depleted field at the half way mark were the Swedish team of Bjorn Waldegaard and Hans Thorszelius, in a British ford Escort. On provisional figures, they had 424 penalty points -- 74 less than their nearest rivals.

    Two days and nights of heavy rain turned stretches of the route into muddy quagmires. As well as putting the drivers and vehicles under strain, the conditions put an extra burden on the works team servicing the cars. Waldegaard and Thorszelius were first to start in the rally, and led for several hundred miles (kilometres) of the 3,750-mile (6,000 kilometre) course before losing the lead to another Ford Escort.

    Kenya's Vic Preston and John Lyall were leading the field at one stage, but they had to return to Nairobi after having problems with the car's clutch, alternators and rear shock absorbers. After appearing set to be among the final leaders, they dropped back to seventh place on points. To re-gain their lead, they had to overcome a broken windscreen and, like all the other competitors, plenty of mud.

    Jean Pierre Nicolas and Jean Todt of France were running third at one stage in their Peugeot. But the Peugeot company, together with ford, Lancia, Opel and Datsun, were forced out of the running for the manufacturers prize because they no longer had the minimum of three cars competing.

    With the other manufacturers unable to compete, the Japanese Colt Lancers were left with a better chance of the manufacturers prize. Three weathered the first leg, holding fourth, sixth and eighth positions. Their attack is being led by Kenya's 'Flying Sikh', Joginder Singh, and co-drive David Doig. Singh has won the Safari three times already -- the only driver in the history of the event to do so.

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  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVABYTMTOLNSOI2Z7UUN0JDMK15A
    Media URN:
    VLVABYTMTOLNSOI2Z7UUN0JDMK15A
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    09/04/1977
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:17:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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