• Short Summary

    In Chile, life for many people is now beginning to return almost to normal for many people although there are still many signs of the coup of September 11.

  • Description

    In Chile, life for many people is now beginning to return almost to normal for many people although there are still many signs of the coup of September 11.

    Shops are open again and the street scenes in many areas seem normal except for the presence of a higher number of soldiers.

    Outside the destroyed Moneda Presidential Palace people stop to examine bullet pockmarks and the street is still littered with glass from the windows.

    In the shops themselves there are queues for some things, notably cigarettes, and also at the newsagents are grim reminders of the coup's aftermath in the shape of photographs and lists of people wanted by the new governing military junta.

    Many of these people fear death if caught and Santiago abounds with reports that left-wingers are being methodically hunted down and shot. Officials have denied reports of mass extermination as left-wing propaganda but morgue officials have reported a thirty per cent increase in fatalities and hundreds of people wait each day outside Santiago's General Cemetery where the names of new bodies are chalked up on a blackboard.

    There is a relentless manhunt by troops for the leaders of the late President Allende's government and there are also regular roadblocks to check cars and other vehicles.

    In addition to political problems, the new government is also facing a bankrupt economy and has moved to regain the confidence of foreign investors by promising to re-open talks on compensation with United States companies whose holdings were expropriated by the Allende government.

    SYNOPSIS: In Santiago, a scene that could be almost normal as people walk along the pavements outside the Moneda Presidential Palace -- still showing the damage caused to it during the coup in which the late President Salvador Allende died and his government was overthrown by a Chilean military junta. Glass still litters the road outside but it's only close examination that reveals the damage to be more than could be caused by an ordinary fire.

    In the shopping areas life seems even more normal as the tempo returns to one of busy commerce despite economic problems which have led the new government to promise to re-open talks about compensation for foreign companies whose holdings were expropriated by the Allende government.

    There are still queues, but it's the newspapers and magazines that really prove a grim reminder of the coup's aftermath with their lists of supporters of the Allende government wanted by the junta. For them, there's a relentless manhunt amid reports of summary executions by shooting, reports denied by the junta as propaganda although morgue officials report a thirty per cent increase in bodies.

    In the streets armed troops are also a reminder that there's no let up in vigilance by the junta which had to face several just of shipping after the coup.

    And near Santiago's airport, checks at a roadblock reinforce the sings of the manhunt and the determination not to let prominent Allende supporters escape. Although life for many may have resumed something of a normal pattern, for them and many other left-wingers, open shops do not mean an end to fear.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVABYBQ16IN1Q0JV9XCDFBD55B9P
    Media URN:
    VLVABYBQ16IN1Q0JV9XCDFBD55B9P
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    29/09/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:56:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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