• Short Summary

    Almost ten thousand Vietnamese refugees are now being cared for at a camp on Galang Island in Indonesia.

  • Description

    1.
    GV Pagodas on hillside Galang Island.
    0.05

    2.
    GVs Campsite. (2 SHOTS)
    0.14

    3.
    GV Boats in harbour.
    0.19

    4.
    GV Goods being unloaded from boat.
    0.29

    5.
    GV People disembarking from boat.
    0.37

    6.
    GV PAN ACROSS Construction work.
    0.46

    7.
    GV PAN TO Completed houses.
    0.53

    8.
    GVs Men working on houses. (4 SHOTS)
    1.15

    9.
    GVs Temporary campsite. (2 SHOTS)
    1.28

    10.
    GV Barrack 87.
    1.33

    11.
    GVs Food being distributed to refugees.
    1.46

    12.
    GV Hospital.
    1.52

    13.
    GV Temporary buildings of Indonesian Red Cross.
    1.57

    14.
    CU Sign German Red Cross.
    2.00

    15.
    GV People walking through camp and LS camp. (2 SHOTS)
    2.11




    Initials JS/





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: Almost ten thousand Vietnamese refugees are now being cared for at a camp on Galang Island in Indonesia. The camp is funded by the Indonesian government and by donations and assistance from abroad.

    SYNOPSIS: The camp on Galang Island was set up in 1979, after a conference on the Asian refugee problem, held in Geneva. Since then, more than 38 thousand people have entered the camp and almost 29 thousand of them have been resettled in other countries. The camp's present population is just over nine and a half thousand refugees.

    The Vietnamese are housed in more than two hundred barracks and there are also schools, a shopping centre, coffee shops and places for Christian and Buddhist worship. Overseas aid groups such the united Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, World Vision and the Save the Children Fund, as well as foreign governments, have contributed much towards the establishment and running of the camp. Most of the island's population are Chinese, but there are smaller numbers of ethnic Vietnamese and Kampucheans. It is the policy of the authorities to make the refugees as self-supporting as possible.

    The refugees have set up their own security system and although there is a contingent of about fifty police on hand, they are not often needed. Food is distributed every three days. There is one packet per family and it includes rice, sugar, tinned milk, vegetables and meat. This can be supplemented from the camp's shopping centre, if the refugees can get money from relatives, or if they have brought any from Vietnam. Medical care is provided by an international team of doctors and nurses. The camp's large hospital, donated last year by the Australian government, is equipped to handle most cases, including surgery. A second, smaller hospital is run by the German Red Cross.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVABXLBZR4TI3FVN1TDG9OOJMVN9
    Media URN:
    VLVABXLBZR4TI3FVN1TDG9OOJMVN9
    Group:
    Reuters - Including Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    15/07/1980
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:12:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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