• Short Summary

    Villagers in South Vietnam are making a bizarre living from the remnants of war. Some?

  • Description

    Villagers in South Vietnam are making a bizarre living from the remnants of war. Some of those who live in a Communist-controlled area are gathering up scrap metal to sell, from along Highway thirteen which links Saigon with An Loc and was the scene of a prolonged battle.

    The villagers come out onto the government side of the road to sell their wares. These are the aluminium bombs, tail-fin stabilisers and fire-bomb canisters they have salvaged. The aluminium fetches about ??? cents a pound from middlemen.

    Some of the more desecrate villagers dig out ???rap iron from among unexploded bombs, shells and mines. For this, they receive only about four cents a pound. Two scavengers were killed recently when a mine exploded.

    A government village in the area surrounded by Vietcong territory, is serviced daily by a motorcycle convoy. The convey travels six miles to the village with food.

    The riders are also allowed to sell small amounts of tea and tobacco to the Vietcong so that the road will remain open to some commercial traffic.

    Two of the convoy taken into custody on route by the Vietcong recently have not been seen since.

    SYNOPSIS: The gruesome remnants of the Vietnam war have become a bizarre source of income for some villagers there. They scavenge the aluminium from the bombs and tail-finds that litter both sides o??? Highway Thirteen.

    The road links Saigon with An Loc and was a major battle ground during the war. Part of it is new controlled by the Communists.

    Some of the villagers from the Vietcong ares also dig for scrap iron among unexploded bombs and mines. Two were killed recently.

    They get about four cents for a pound of iron and fifty cents a pound for the aluminium.

    As well as sanctioning this commerce, the Communists allow a convoy of motorcyclists to bring food to a government village isolated by their territory.

    The drivers also sell small amounts of tea and tobacco to the Vietcong -- a practice designed to ensure the read stays open to some commercial traffic.

    Two of the convoy were stopped by the Vietcong recently and have not been seen since. But the exchange indicates that some freedom of movement exists.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVABW3LAW0ZPJWCQG0X2K2CRX9HL
    Media URN:
    VLVABW3LAW0ZPJWCQG0X2K2CRX9HL
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    21/05/1973
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:01:19:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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