• Short Summary

    Reaching his largest "live" audience since he arrived in the United States, Soviet Premier Khrushchev submitted himself Oct 9 to an unrehearsed interview on the New York television programme "Open End".

  • Description

    Reaching his largest "live" audience since he arrived in the United States, Soviet Premier Khrushchev submitted himself Oct 9 to an unrehearsed interview on the New York television programme "Open End". The Russian leader was closely questioned by producer David Susskind who acts as producer on the weekly discussion programme.

    Asked why he continued to "perpetuate the myth" that while the American people were dedicated to peace the United States Government was little more than a war-mongering organization,Mr Khrushchev hesitated, and then said (Russian SOF) that had it had not been for the U-2 spy plane incident better relations between the Russian and American people would have come about.

    He said it was the dream of the Soviet people to have good relations with the United States, and during his visit to America last year, he had striven to promote such relations. But since then the U-2 was sent over Russian territory. Was this friendship? he asked.

    Premier Khrushchev refused to accept international arbitration on the RB-47 incident, claiming that this was a "domestic issue" and arbitration could not help. How could it be said, he asked, that the RB-47 was an international affair when, in the case of the U-2 incident, the United States had also at first denied at the aircraft was over Russian territory.

    Asked if he would agree to a world plebiscite - suggested by President Eisenhower - in which all peoples would be polled on their opinion on self-determination, Mr Khrushchev replied that during the first world war, after an American "invasion" had taken place, there was a plebiscite in Russian, and the people had answered in favour of the Socialist system. He said "The Russian people took a broom and swept the invaders into the sea and established socialism."
    At one pause in the television programme, an advertisement appeared on the screen. It was a call by "Radio Free Europe" for funds to promote their "crusader for freedom" in the satellite countries of Eastern Europe. Mr Khrushchev did not appear to have been aware of this advertisement.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVABUP94EDJXRCUQ1YNDJL75FDE6
    Media URN:
    VLVABUP94EDJXRCUQ1YNDJL75FDE6
    Group:
    Reuters - Incuding Visnews
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    10/10/1960
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:01:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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