• Short Summary

    The ancient city of Tallinn, which has been an important northern European port for a thousand years, is having a new, deepwater port built.

  • Description

    1.
    GV EXTERIOR Tip of spire PULL BACK TO LV Showing port PAN
    0.22

    2.
    GV Cranes on dockside PAN ALONG water to berthed ship
    0.35

    3.
    SV Waves on shoreline showing reclaimed land PAN TO Moored ship near distant shore
    1.00

    4.
    GV Ship moored near freshly-disturbed land
    1.06

    5.
    GV Earthmoving machine dumping rocks
    1.16

    6.
    GV Bulldozer pushing earth (2 shots)
    1.39

    7.
    SV Sailors helping man into diving suit
    1.49

    8.
    SCU Hands attaching straps to diving boots
    1.51

    9.
    CU Visor being screwed onto helmet, diver clambering off side of ship into water and sinking beneath surface
    2.18

    10.
    GV Open-backed truck going along roadway
    2.24




    Initials JS/SW





    Script is copyright Reuters Limited. All rights reserved

    Background: The ancient city of Tallinn, which has been an important northern European port for a thousand years, is having a new, deepwater port built. Tallinn itself lies on Tallinn Bay in the Gulf of Finland. The protected bay is ice-free all year round. Because its existing port, which is right in the heart of the city, could not expand without damaging part of one of Europe's most superb medieval cities, the new port is being constructed at Muuga Bay nearby. It will be the largest Soviet Baltic port, capable of handling ships displacing more than 100,000 tonnes. To accommodate such leviathans, some 14 million cubic metres of soil is being gouged from the seabed. Mixed with road metal, it is being laid down as landfill along the shoreline. More than 20 service buildings will be built as port facilities on this new land. The installation of the latest equipment will mean that the enlarged port will need only half the work force of the existing one. Reuters news agency has reported the new port, attracting trade, industry and thousands of new jobs, is worrying native Estonians. Official statistics already show that Estonians make up only 53 per cent of Tallinn's population, and merely 63 per cent of the 1.5 million people in the entire Estonian republic. They fear the influx of Russians and other from the Soviet Union will reduce them to a minority, endangering the culture and customs in which Estonians have retained considerable pride.

  • Tags

  • Data

    Film ID:
    VLVABR0VB4TCXSVBFBWFGSLM5IMLN
    Media URN:
    VLVABR0VB4TCXSVBFBWFGSLM5IMLN
    Group:
    Reuters - Source to be Verified
    Archive:
    Reuters
    Issue Date:
    13/12/1982
    Sound:
    Unknown
    HD Format:
    Available on request
    Stock:
    Colour
    Duration:
    00:02:25:00
    Time in/Out:
    /
    Canister:
    N/A

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